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English and Media Department

We are proud to be a department which encourages and supports all pupils to achieve and exceed their aspirations through offering opportunities across a range of disciplines: Literature, Language and Media Studies. As a team, we are driven by the pursuit of creating an ever-evolving curriculum which allows staff to deliver inspiring lessons which are both engaging and culturally relevant for our young people.

Our curriculum is underpinned by the following five principles:

Empowerment: The sequencing of our curriculum empowers every student to recognise, use and craft language as a tool to become articulate and confident communicators of the future.

Independence: Our knowledge and word-rich curriculum is underpinned with the intent to build on our student’s cultural capital to enable them to become independent, critical and evaluative thinkers of the 21st century.

Equality: The breadth and depth of our ambitious and diverse curriculum ensures all students, regardless of background, are equipped with the skills and knowledge to strive for academic excellence.

Craftsmanship: Our seven year curriculum, provides students with the opportunity to celebrate and replicate writer’s craft across 500 years which facilitates a deep and rich understanding of literature.

Reflection: We believe that our curriculum should be organic and evolve alongside society, challenging bias, discrimination and prejudice in order to support the holistic development of our students.

All of these skills ensure that students are rigorously prepared for the new GCSEs in Language, Literature and Media Studies with further opportunities to pursue these subjects at A-Level. We look forward to welcoming you to the department and hope to inspire in you the same passion that we all have for our subject.

For detailed information on specifications refer to the Key Stage 4 or Key Stage 5 prospectus.

English and Media Intent

Founded on the five principles of Empowerment, Independence, Equality, Craftsmanship and Reflection, our English curriculum ensures that our student’s literary and linguistic educational journey is at the heart of everything we do and offer. The breadth and depth of our deliberate 7-year sequenced curriculum empowers and enthuses all students, regardless of individual starting points and inclusive of all backgrounds, to flourish beyond the walls of their Brooke Weston education. From entry to exit, the thread of educational excellence is woven into the fabric of our curriculum through exposing our students to literary craft from an array of genres, time periods and cultures. Our intent is to equip each student with the ability to illustrate their innate understanding of belonging. Through promoting literacy skills into each lesson, we support students to become word-rich and articulate users of language, and in turn sensitive, lifelong learners and thinkers with aspirational futures.

The Team

Emily O'Keeffe

Assistant Principal, Head of Department

eokeeffe@brookeweston.org

Rebecca Liquorish

Second in English

rliquorish@brookeweston.org

Leah Patterson

Head of Key Stage 4

lpatterson@brookeweston.org

Rebecca Jones

Head of Key Stage 5

rjones@brookeweston.org

Jamie Jones

Teacher of English, Professional Tutor

jjones@brookeweston.org

Lauren Fitzjohn

Teacher of English, Literacy Lead

lfitzjohn@brookeweston.org

Victoria Stevens

Teacher of English

vstevens@brookeweston.org

Frankie Macleod

Teacher of English and Media

fmacleod@brookeweston.org

Sarita Walvin

Teacher of English

swalvin@brookeweston.org

James Browning

Teacher of English and Media

jbrowning@brookeweston.org  

Charlee Broad

Teacher of English

cbroad@brookeweston.org

The Curriculum

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Term 1: The Bone Sparrow

To support the transition between KS2 and KS3, students will start their first term of Year 7 with an exploration of Fraillon’s novel The Bone Sparrow. Students will read the entire novel, drawing links between characters and contemporary issues impacting identities such as the plight of refugees in detention centres, migration and bias media representation. Their contextual understanding of these issues will be supplemented through the engagement with non-fiction extracts. During their study of this novel, students will also begin to develop skills such as inference and language analysis, focusing on how language shapes meaning.

Term 2 - Culture & identity poetry 

Culture and Identity Poetry 
During Term 2, students will move on to a second literary form: poetry. This module exposes students to different cultures and diverse worldviews, and encourages students to understand how our culture shapes our identity through an exploration of poetry. Throughout this module, students will be introduced to key poetic terminology and will begin to understand how to annotate poetry. 

Term 3 - Transformative writing: Travel 

During the latter half of this term, students will move onto non-fiction creative writing and will explore and analyse the different forms and writing styles associated with travel writing. Building on this understanding, students will then piece together their own holiday package, exploring the conventions of different non-fiction formats; persuasive and descriptive language features and basic presentation skills. 

Term 4 - ‘Twelfth Night’ – William Shakespeare 

Adding to their developing confidence in approaching two forms of literature, students will be introduced to a new form: the play text.

Students will revisit the impact of a writer’s use of characterisation, setting and symbolism as introduced in ‘The Bone Sparrow’ and Culture and Identity Poetry.

Students develop ability and confidence to decode and understand Shakespeare’s language. Students will also explore key themes such as love, power and gender and the supernatural in the plot and examine the impact of Elizabethan contextual issues such as patriarchal society on characterisation.

Term 5 - Nineteenth Century Literature

Through their exploration of Shakespeare, students will have developed familiarity with different variations of English and will be more equipped to decode the archaic language of 19th century literature.

Students develop their understanding of socio-historic and literary context through moving to a new historical period.

Through their study of a whole novel, students will chart and analyse characterisation, themes and motifs across an entire text such as familial relationships, social class and inclusion.

Year 8

Term 1: Flash fiction and short stories

In Year 8, students will be introduced to a new literary form: the short story. Alongside analysing and exploring current short stories, including 6-word-stories, students will also have the opportunity to put their understanding into practice by writing their own short stories.

Term 2 - Protest Poetry

In Term 2, students will be introduced to new structural poetical terms (e.g. caesura, enjambment) and the understanding of poetic language devices from Year 7 will be revisited. In this module, students will study pre-19th century and contemporary poetry and chart how protests have evolved over time.

To supplement their understanding of this module, students will also study the poetry through an exploration of non-fiction works around the themes and motifs of the poems.

Term 3 - The Weight of Water

To complement students’ study of poetry and to develop familiarity with this form, students will be introduced to a new form of literature: the verse novel.

Contemporary text enables students to focus predominantly on understanding and exploring the form alongside an understanding of the issues explored in this novel.

Term 4 - Julius Caesar

Building on their already secure knowledge of the conventions of a play, students will spend Term 4 - broadening their experience of Shakespearean plays by studying Julius Caesar, a History. During this module, students will focus on reading the play in its entirety and understanding characterisation, themes and motifs. Alongside this, students will also explore Shakespeare’s intent and wider message to audiences, building on the concept of the ‘conscious construct’ which was introduced at the end of Year 7.

Term 5 - The Novel: Salt to the Sea – Ruta Sepetys or The Book Thief- Markus Zusak

Students will complete Year 8 by studying one of the above novels. Alongside reading and analysing the novels, students will focus on honing their ‘what,how,why’ paragraphs, learning how to strike the perfect balance between a developed response, analysis of methods and authorial intent.

Alongside an analysis of the novel, students will practice transformational writing, using the novel as a stimulus. In this part of the module, students will explore the effect of different narrative structures, such as narrative voice, flashbacks, foreshadowing and dual narrative etc.

Year 9

Term 1: Macbeth

By the time students have reached Y9, they will have studied a Shakespearean comedy (Twelfth Night – Y7) and a history (Julius Caesar – Y8). In order to perfect their Shakespearean genre skillset, students will study a play from his final genre: a tragedy.

To further ease the KS4 transition, there is a clear focus on extract-based analysis and application of contextual factors (regicide, Aristotelian tragedy, Divine Right of Kings, GCOB, Machiavelli) alongside a firm focus on authorial intent

Term 2 - Renaissance to Victorian Poetry

In Term 2, students are exposed to other works from some of the poets they will go on to study at GCSE (Shakespeare, Shelley, Wordsworth, Blake and Browning) in order for students to explore poetry within their contexts, analysing language, structure and form. Alongside this, students will also be introduced to the key tropes of Renaissance, Romantic and Victorian poetry which will provide scaffolding for their understanding at GCSE level. Students will also continue to build on the skills developed in Year 7 and 8 by thematically comparing two poems.

Term 3 - Introduction to Gothic

Finishing the previous module on a study of the macabre in Robert Browning’s poetry, students will continue their chronological studies by moving on to the Victorian ‘Gothic’.

Students will revisit and refine their creative writing skills (essential for Section B of LP1 and LP2)  through replicating the writing styles and methods of canonical Gothic writers: Stoker’s ‘Dracula’, Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’ and Wilde’s ‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’.

Term 4 - Frankenstein

To build on students’ understanding of the gothic genre, the ‘introductory’ module will be followed by an in-depth study of a canonical gothic text by a female author: Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’.

The study of ‘Frankenstein’ is fundamental to students’ contextual understanding of the scientific developments and experimentation in the Victorian era, a theme which underpins Stevenson’s ‘Jekyll and Hyde’.

Term 5 - Writing: Becoming the detective

Students will finish both Y9 and their chronological study of Literature by exploring the developments in detective fiction from the 19th to 21st century through this extract-based module.

Students will be introduced to the tropes of detective fiction by studying extracts from canonical detective writers such as Conan Doyle, Christie, and Sayers.

Key Stage 4

English (Literature & Language)

Year 10

Term 1

GCSE Link: AQA Literature Paper 2, Section A

An introduction to modern drama study and analysis, with a specific focus on: themes, characterisation, authorial methods, structure, form, context, genre etc. Students will supplement their understanding of the play and the key themes that it explores through a contextual exploration of two specific time periods: pre and post-world war Britain. With a confident understanding of Edwardian society, students will be able to engage with authorial intent and understand the message that Priestley was offering politically, socially and historically. By the end of this module, students will have developed the skill set to enable them to respond to a closed-book exam that assesses their knowledge of the play and their ability to structure an argument and analyse language.

Term 2

 

GCSE Link: AQA English Language Paper 1

In preparation for Section A of Language Paper 1, students will engage with a range of fictional extracts in order to develop their reading skills with a specific focus on analysing and evaluating the writer's use of language and structure.

For Section B of the paper, students will develop their writing skills in order to respond to either a descriptive or narrative writing tasks. 

Term 3

GCSE Link: AQA Literature Paper 2, Section B & C                                                                            
Throughout this module, students will study all fifteen poems that make up the Power and Conflict anthology. Students will analyse language, form and structure of each poem as well as exploring the authorial intent and contextual significance for each. Students will be working towards the thematic comparison of two given poems and will develop skills needed to structure an analysis response. Students will be exposed to the 15 poems listed below:
1. Ozymandias – Percy Shelley
2. London – William Blake
3. Extract from, The Prelude – William Wordsworth
4. My Last Duchess – Robert Browning
5. The Charge of the Light Brigade – Alfred Lord Tennyson
6. Exposure – Wilfred Owen
7. Storm on the Island – Seamus Heaney
8. Bayonet Charge – Ted Hughes
9. Remains – Simon Armitage
10. Poppies – Jane Weir.
11. War Photographer – Carol Ann Duffy
12. Tissue – Imtiaz Dharker
13. The Emigree – Carol Rumens
14. Checking Out Me History – John Agard
15. Kamikaze – Beatrice Garland

Students will need to have a thorough and in-depth knowledge of all 15 poems including: language, form and structural choices, context and time period for which they were written and authorial purpose.

Term 4

GCSE Link: AQA English Language Paper 2

In preparation for Section A of Language Paper 2, students will engage with an array of non-fiction extracts that are linked thematically and will develop their ability to compare alongside analysing language and considering authorial intent. 
For Section B of this paper students will further develop their ability to write for a purpose (advise, argue, persuade and inform) that appropriately matches audience and genre requirements. 


GCSE Link: Non-Examined Assessment - Spoken Language

Students will be given a presentation to complete linked to a topic they have studied in English. Student will independently create their presentations, with guidance from their teacher, and deliver them to an audience. Students will be assessed for this using Pass, Merit or Distinction grades. Students must complete this unit in order to pass their Language subject.

Term 5

GCSE Link: AQA Literature Paper 1, Section B

An introduction to 19th Century, canonical literature through the exploration and analysis of Stevenson's gothic novella, Jekyll and Hyde. Students will read the entire novella with a specific focus on, characterisation, authorial methods, structure, form, context, genre etc. Students will develop a confident understanding of Victorian society to complement their textual analysis and will engage with authorial intent and understand the message that Stevenson was offering politically, socially and historically. By the end of this module, students will have developed the skillset to enable them to respond to a closed-book exam that assesses their knowledge of the play and their ability to structure an argument and analyse language

Year 11

Term 1

GCSE Link: AQA Literature Paper 1, Section A Literature Paper 1: Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet x2 lessons per week

An introduction to canonical Shakespearean literature through the exploration and analysis of Shakespeare's tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. Students will read the entire play with a specific focus on, characterisation, authorial methods, structure, form, context, conventions of a play, genre etc. Students will develop a confident understanding of Elizabethan society to complement their textual analysis and will engage with authorial intent and understand the message that Stevenson was offering politically, socially and historically. By the end of this module, students will have developed the skillset to enable them to respond to a closed-book exam that assesses their knowledge of the play and their ability to structure an argument and analyse language. Academic essay writing will also be introduced and practised alongside the learning of content.

Language Paper 2: Writer’s Viewpoints and Perspectives X2 lessons per week

Revision of Paper 2 components: students will engage with two pieces of non-fiction writing and their development of reading and comparison skills, specifically for Section A. They will be exploring structure, analysing/comparing writer’s viewpoints and explaining the purpose of writer’s choices of language. Students will also be shown how to compare the texts contextually.

Term 2

 

Literature Paper 1: Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet 
x2 lessons per week
Continuation of and close study of the play including: themes, characterisation, authorial methods, structure, form, context, genre etc.
Students will develop their contextual knowledge of the Elizabethan era, enabling them to draw upon this time period when outlining the intentions of the playwright, William Shakespeare.
Academic essay writing will also be introduced and practised alongside the learning of content.


Language Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing
X2 lessons per week
Revision of Paper 1 components: students will engage with a piece of fictional writing and their development of reading skills, specifically for Section A. They will be exploring structure, analysing writer’s methods and explaining the purpose of writer’s choices of language. 
For Section B of the Paper students will utilise the methods learnt to create their own piece of narrative/descriptive writing.

Term 3

Students will be revising the 15 poems listed below:


1. Ozymandias – Percy Shelley
2. London – William Blake
3. Extract from, The Prelude – William Wordsworth
4. My Last Duchess – Robert Browning
5. The Charge of the Light Brigade – Alfred Lord Tennyson
6. Exposure – Wilfred Owen
7. Storm on the Island – Seamus Heaney
8. Bayonet Charge – Ted Hughes
9. Remains – Simon Armitage
10. Poppies – Jane Weir
11. War Photographer – Carol Ann Duffy
12. Tissue – Imtiaz Dharker
13. The Emigree – Carol Rumens
14. Checking Out Me History – John Agard
15. Kamikaze – Beatrice Garland

Students should already have a thorough and in-depth knowledge of all 15 poems including: language, form and structural choices, context and time period for which they were written and authorial purpose. 
Students will also explore a range of Unseen poetry, building on their learning over the course.

Paper 1: Section B
X2 lessons a week
A range of writing skills to be revised and secured across the fiction paper.

Term 4

Paper 1, Section B Literature Revision: Jekyll and Hyde X2 lessons a week Paper 1: Section B
X2 lessons a week
A range of writing skills to be revised and secured across the fiction paper. By the end of this module, students will have developed the skillset to enable them to respond to a closed-book exam that assesses their knowledge of the play and their ability to structure an argument and analyse language.          

Term 5

Consolidation and Revision of all texts across both Literature and Language papers
Teachers are given autonomy with their classes to address areas of particular concern for their students. In addition students will be able to make use of: 
  Weekly workouts
  5-A-Day starters and homework activities
  Knowledge-based quizzes and testing
  Knowledge organisers (Students to see how much they can reproduce of the original organisers)
  ‘Know it, Grasp it, Think it’ style activities where students are directed towards a level of challenge

Media Studies

Year 10

Term 1: Introduction to Media Studies

This term, students will be introduced to the terminology of media studies and will be taught how to apply this language in the exploration of representations. Students will explore how mediation is influenced by the producers’ intentions and socio-cultural contexts and learn how to apply this analysis to a range of different media forms.

Term 2 - Paper 1 Section B: Promoting Media

 

This term, students will begin exploring the examination content linked to promotional media campaigns. Students will explore how the film industry is operated and regulated, considering the benefits of conglomerate ownership and revenue generation. They will also explore the relationship between print advertising campaigns and linked products.  The set text for this unit is The Lego Movie. 

Term 3 - Paper 1 Section A: Television

This term, students will begin the study of the Television form. They will explore how media language is used to construct representations that are purposefully designed to reinforce and subvert stereotypes. In addition to this process of mediation, students will also explore how media industries and media audiences influence the creating of meaning within a product. Students will study the pilot episode of ‘Cuffs’ (2015) and explore how the nature of the BBC as a public service broadcaster influenced its content. Students will also study an episode of ‘The Avengers’ (1965) to consider how historical contexts have changed to create different representations. 

Term 4 - Paper 1 Revision

This term will be devoted to the revision of cross-media promotional campaigns and television. Students will be presented with a range of different examination style questions to develop their exam skills. 
Students will also begin the research and planning for their non-exam assessment (briefs are released on March 1st each year). The students will explore how existing products construct meaning to enable them to replicate the necessary codes and conventions

Term 5 - Making Media (Non-Exam Assessment)

Students will spend this term completing the planning and production of their Non-Exam Assessment. Students will produce the front cover and a double-page spread for a new magazine in response to a brief set by the exam board. This NEA constitutes 30% of student’s overall GCSE. 

Year 11

Term 1: Newspapers

This term, students will begin the study of newspapers and the methods by which they construct meanings for their target audiences. Students will explore print newspapers, online news and the posts made on social and participatory media accounts. Students will develop a secure understanding of the newspaper genre conventions and will consider how audience needs influence genre hybridity. Students will study a range of editions of their set text (The Observer) among a variety of additional resources. Students will develop an understanding of the socio-cultural and political climate that has influenced the rise in ‘fake-news’ and increasing mistrust in news organisations.

Term 2 - Paper 2 Section A: Music (Revision)

 

This term, students will revise the study of music magazines, music videos and radio production that they studied in Year 10. Students will be exposed to a range of different exam questions in order to develop their exam technique, while also engaging in class debate around the role of gender stereotyping within the music industry. 
NEA Research and Planning
Students will complete the necessary research and planning to complete their non-exam assessment. 

Term 3 - NEA Production (+ Revision)

This term, students will produce their Non-Exam Assessment using image editing software (Photoshop or Photopea). Students will produce the front cover and a double-page spread for a new magazine in response to a brief set by the exam board. This NEA constitutes 30% of student’s overall GCSE.
Alongside this production, students will also complete some revision of the television, news and music magazine topics. 

Term 4-5 

This term will be devoted to the revision of examination content. They will explore all media forms and set texts, ensuring that their knowledge is secure. Students will be presented with a range of different examination style questions to develop their exam skills. 

Key Stage 5

English Language

Year 12

Term 1

Students will be introduced to core linguistic Frameworks and be given an introduction to grammar. Within this focus area, students will explore different features of language; key terminology and how they work together, in order to create key texts. Furthermore, students will also be introduced to key ideas, theories and concepts relating to the following language areas: Occupation, Politeness, Power and Gender.

Term 2

 

Students will build upon their knowledge of key linguistic frameworks and begin to apply textual analysis skills to the Meanings and Representations paper. (Paper 1 Section A). Students will also be introduced to Paper 2 Question 3, whereby they will learn how to apply key skills to an exam question. Moreover, students will continue to explore: Gender, Power etc and begin to ‘evaluate’ key studies and theories.

Term 3

Students will be introduced to the ‘Powers of Language’ which introduces students to the structure of the NEA style assessment, needed for Year 13. Students will explore the construction of texts, considering how they are used to: story tell, persuade or inform and then create their own original writing and commentary based on this. Students will continue to revise on key theories and concepts, but they will also move on to: Dialectology and Synchronic Language Change.

Term 4

Students will continue exploring Dialectology and Language Change, whilst beginning to apply this knowledge to create an ‘opinion article’ style response. Students will not only have to demonstrate their understanding of key ideas and concepts, but also begin to develop their own personal ‘voice’ in their writing.

Term 5

Students will be exploring the requirements of the NEA and will be constructing their own language investigation, original writing and commentary pieces – based on a language area/style model of their choice.

Year 13

Term 1

Students will explore two main modules from their A Level paper: Language Change (World Englishes) and Child Language Acquisition (Reading and Writing). This will give students the opportunity to acquire knowledge and understanding of key theories and concepts. Both topics will also allow students to develop their evaluative skills – a requirement of the A2 Papers.

Term 2

Students will continue their study of Language Change and Child Language Acquisition. This will review and build upon any prior knowledge of the topic areas and give students the opportunity to refine their understanding of the topics – with a focus on how to apply these to exam style questions. Students will also be given time to complete their language investigations, whereby they will research into a language topic of their choice and create a specific and purposeful investigation relating to this.

Term 3

Students will be revising Paper 1 Section A (Meanings and Representations), with a predominant focus on Q3. This will enable students to strengthen their ability to write a comparison style question, whereby they will discuss and evaluate the effectiveness of two texts. This will build upon key skills acquired in Year 12, however due to the second text being a more archaic text, students will also develop their ability to consider how historical and societal context has an impact on text construction. Students will also be revising Q3 of Paper 2 and have the opportunity to revisit elements of Language Change and Child Language Acquisition – in light of knowledge tests and audits.

Term 4

Students will be revising and enriching their understanding of key language topics: Gender, Dialectology, Power etc. – all of which were studied in Year 12. Students will be able to consolidate their understanding of these topic areas, whilst using their refined evaluative skills, obtained in Year 13, to apply these to exam style questions.

Term 5

Students will have the opportunity to revisit and revise both Papers and be exposed to a range of exam style questions and activities.

English Literature

Year 12

Term 1

Student will be Introduced to Paper 1 unseen poetry within this focus areas they will be exploring poetry within their context analysing language, structure and form. This is presented as an extension to the 11 year transition unit provided for potential year 12 literature students over the summer. Students will also be Introduced to Paper 1’s core prose text Atonement, here they will be employing analysis using extracts from the prose text to explore language, structure and form; they will be applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent to the prose text in preparation for comparison to poetry in the examination. Student will be simultaneously introduced to Paper 1’s core drama text: Othello. They will be analysing it to explore language, structure and form applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent through class reading and independent discussion.

Term 2

 

Students will continue Paper 1 analysis through their studying of Atonement and the introduction of the poetry anthology (AQA). Analysis will continue comparatively across the prose and poetry texts, moving through the collection exploring language, structure and form; students will be applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent to the prose text comparatively to the poems within the anthology – placing each poem in its context and analysing language, structure and form whilst applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent. Poems will be taught in clusters to support comparison.

Their Paper 1 study of Othello will also continue where they will analyse language, structure and form applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Term 3

Students complete their Paper 1 core texts of Atonement and the introduction of the poetry anthology (AQA). Here they will prepare for the A2 examination analysing all three within exam questions and refine their examination style and delivery.

Their Paper 1 study of Othello will equally be concluded, and exam best practice employed to ensure language, structure and form are analysed, applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Term 4

Students will be introduced to the NEA element of their course study – a series of satellite texts will be introduced and analysed individually through a series of extracts  exploring language, structure and form; students will be applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent to each text.

Students will be guided on choosing two texts to compare independently selecting a question that challenges and provokes insight and engagement across the chosen genres.

Term 5

Students will revise unseen poetry from term 1 and complete their final drafts of their NEA.

Revision of Paper 1 will take place to secure remote provision teaching.

An introduction to Paper 2 will commence covering introductions to core texts.

Year 13

Term 1

Student will be Introduced to Paper 2 unseen prose within this focus areas they will be exploring texts within their context analysing language, structure and form. Students will also be Introduced to Paper 2’s core texts Feminine Gospels and The Handmaid’s Tale, here they will be employing analysis using extracts from the prose text to explore language, structure and form; they will be applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent to the prose text comparatively to the poems within the anthology – placing each poem in its context and analysing language, structure and form whilst applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent. Student will be simultaneously introduced to Paper 2’s core drama text: A Streetcar Named Desire. They will be analysing it to explore language, structure and form applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Term 2

Students will continue Paper 2 through their studying of Feminine Gospels and The Handmaid’s Tale. Analysis will continue through the collection using extracts from the prose text to explore language, structure and form; applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent to the prose text comparatively to the poems within the anthology – placing each poem in its context and analysing language, structure and form whilst applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Their Paper 2 study of A Streetcar Named Desire will also continue where they will analyse language, structure and form applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Term 3

Students complete their Paper 2 core texts of Feminine Gospels and The Handmaid’s Tale. Here they will prepare for the examination analysing all three within exam questions and refine their examination style and delivery.

Their Paper 2 study of A Streetcar Named Desire will equally be concluded, and exam best practice employed to ensure language, structure and form are analysed, applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Paper 2 Revision of unseen prose from term 1 is also returned to – exploring texts within their context analysing language, structure and form. Here they will expand on the learning from term 1 and refine their essay writing as their contextual awareness has been developed over the other core elements.

Term 4

Students return to their year 12 studied texts for Paper 1 revision. They will revise the drama text Othello; revision will be extract based analysis to explore language, structure and form applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Paper 1 revision will also take place of the Poetry anthology and the prose text Atonement. revision will be extract based analysis using extracts from Atonement to explore language, structure and form; applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent to the prose text comparatively to the poems within the anthology – placing each poem in its context and analysing language, structure and form whilst applying context, critical theory and writer’s intent.

Paper 2 and Paper 1 exam skills and success will be explored in the latter end of the term for mock preparation: students will be analysing exam questions linked to all elements of each paper. Speed planning and diagnostic analysis of the exam criteria based on student confidence will be employed to create a tailored curriculum.

Term 5

In preparation for the final examinations, students will be revision Paper 1 and 2 in relation to exam preparation. They will be analysing exam questions linked to all elements of each paper including speed planning and diagnostic analysis of the exam criteria based on student confidence.

Media Studies

Year 12

Term 1

The content for A Level Media Studies is delivered by two teachers who split the topics and deliver them simultaneously. Paper 1 Section A: Newspapers (Media Language) Students will be introduced to the newspaper form. They will develop a secure understanding of genre conventions and explore how genre hybridity has become the result of a changing audience landscape. Students will explore how elements of media language such as intertextuality, semiotics, ideologies and a range of media language theories. Paper 1 Section B: Advertising Students will be introduced to the techniques of semiotic analysis within the advertising genre. They will explore the how advertisers encode their produces with meaning and intertextual references to develop a layered and multi-faceted advertising campaign. Students will also be encouraged to explore how ideologies and viewpoints are embedded within the products.

Term 2

Paper 1 Section A: Newspapers (Media Representations)
Students will build upon their previous study by exploring how the selection and combination of media language created layered representations. They will consider how this mediation process has been influenced by social, cultural, political and economic contexts while exploring a range of different news products in print, online and through social media. 
Paper 1 Section B: Magazines + Music Videos
Students will develop their techniques of semiotic analysis, applying their skills to various magazines (including their set text: The Big Issue) and music videos. Students will develop their ability to critically engage with these media forms and engage with the viewpoints and ideologies that have been constructed. 

Term 3

Paper 1 Section A: Newspapers (Media Industries and Media Audiences)
The third and final Newspapers unit will require students to study the newspaper industry. They will consider how news is produced, distributed and circulated in addition to the methods of revenue generation and regulation that impact news production. They will also consider how the news industry is influenced by social, cultural, economic and political contexts, developing the necessary critical skills that will enable them to interrogate the origins and intentions of news stories. 
Making Media
Students will complete a miniature production project that follows the same exam board-set brief published the previous year. Students will be asked to research the genre of magazine that they have been set, exploring how media language is used to construct meaning. They will replicate these generic conventions through the production of an original front cover, contents page and homepage for a new magazine of their own creation. This will enable students to familiarise themselves with the tools of Photoshop that will be used to create their real NEAs in Year 13. 

Term 4

Revision
Throughout this term, students will follow a scheme of learning designed to support their revision of all Paper 1 content and all of the theorists they have studies throughout the year. Students will be exposed to a range of examination style questions that will support their development of exam skills and develop their understanding of the exam requirements. Focus will be given to developing students ability to apply theoretical perspectives and evaluate these concepts in relation to the newspaper form. 

Term 5

Paper 2 Section A: Radio, Film, Video Games
Students will begin the study of Paper 2 Section A. This content requires students to have a complete and developed understanding of the operation of the film, video game and radio industries which they will illustrate with references to a range of set texts. Where video games and radio are concerned, students will also consider how audiences are specifically targeted and how they are able to interact and engage with a product both before and after its release. 
Non-Exam Assessment: Research and Planning
Students will be presented with the research and planning brief for their coursework. Throughout the term, students will develop a portfolio of fully analysed style models and thorough planning that will enable them to complete the production of their NEAs with ease. Production will commence early in Year 13. 

Year 13

Term 1

Long Form Television Drama (Stranger Things & The Killing) – Media Language, Media Industries and Media Audiences This term, students will study the media language used in the pilot episodes of one US Television Drama (Stranger Things) and one non-English Language Television Drama (The Killing). Weekly lessons will be taught by two teachers who will each take responsibility for the delivery of one of the set texts, both ensuring that they cover similar content in consecutive lessons to allow the students the opportunity to compare their understanding of the texts. Analysis within Term 1 will centre on the producer’s use of Media Language to construct meaning while considering the role of media industries and audiences in the making of creative decisions. Theory – Students will revise theory studied throughout Year 12 and practise applying this theory to a different media form.

Term 2

Long Form Television Drama (Stranger Things & The Killing) – Media Representations
This term, students will consolidate their understanding of the media language used to create meaning by exploring how the selection and combination of elements construct specific representations that either reinforce or challenge existing stereotypes. Students will consider the impact of social, cultural, political and economic contexts on these representations while still considering the influence media industries and audiences. 
Theory – Students will revise theory studied throughout Year 12 and practise applying this theory to a different media form. 

Term 3

NEA Production (+Revision)
This term, students will produce their Non-Exam Assessments using image editing software (Photoshop or Photopea – online) and Wix (website builder). By the end of term, students will submit their complete NEA for marking. 
Alongisde NEA production, students will be given a range of different revision activities that will cover content studied throughout Year 12 and year 13. This content will encourage students to complete independent revision and produce exam style responses to ensure that these skills continue to develop. 

Term 4 / 5

Revision
Students will follow a set plan of revision lessons throughout the term that will ensure their understanding of all aspects of the examination content.  Students will be exposed to a range of examination style questions that will support their development of exam skills and develop their understanding of the exam requirements. Focus will be given to developing students’ abilities to apply theoretical perspectives and the evaluation of these concepts. 

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