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Design Technology and Food

The Brooke Weston Design Technology and Food Nutrition & Preparation team, are comprised of committed, passionate and dedicated experts in their respective fields, bringing a wealth of academic excellence and industrial knowledge into the classroom.

For detailed information on specifications refer to the Key Stage 4 or Key Stage 5 prospectus.

We are extremely proud to be one of the most popular option subjects within Brooke Weston and offer our students a challenging and rewarding experience. Our purpose built Design Technology and Food Preparation & Nutrition areas contain all the latest technology one would expect to see in an outstanding school. Students have full access to a wide range of creative processes, techniques and technologies, ranging from growing their own materials in textiles, programming robotic arms, or preparing & serving professional culinary recipes during departmental shows or events. Our expectations are high and students rise to the challenge by creating innovative, imaginative and highly creative products that often appear in educational and professional journals. Whilst also securing placements in many leading universities to study Industrial Design; Architecture; Fashion & Shoe Manufacturing, degree level Apprenticeships in food science and Engineering.

We take pride in being a fully inclusive department and so it is not surprising that we secure outstanding results year on year, which is a testament to the hard work of both the pupils and staff within Design Technology and Food Preparation & Nutrition.

Food and Technology Intent

Our mission is to not only ensure students reach their full academic and creative potential, therefore successfully attaining the next level of their education, but also preparing them for the yet, unforeseen, creative and engineering opportunities that will arise during the emergence of the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’.

Enhancement Opportunities

The department participates in an extensive range of competitions and extra-curricular activities, which include:

  • Wool4School
  • Arkwright Scholarship
  • RHS Campaign for School Gardening

There are also opportunities for students to enrich their learning through trips to New Designers, Graduate Fashion Week, Farm Trip focused on food provenance, Healthy Butcher challenge, Rotary Young Chef, Starpack competition, Rotary Young Chef competition, Future Chef competition and Game Star competitions.

The Curriculum

Key Stage 3

Students will be taught 4 separate specialisms moving through these on a carousel of 12-14 weeks each. Students will be taught in 3 rotations; Food Technology, Textiles Technology, Product Design and Engineering will be taught in one rotation.

Year 7

Food Technology

Healthy Eating
Food Technology in year 7 looks at developing basic cooking skills, health and safety in the kitchen, hygiene and nutrition. We explore what a healthy balanced diet involves through studying the eatwell guide and learn to cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes including cous cous salad, cheese scones, bread rolls and ratatouille.

Engineering

Students will gain knowledege into levers and their applications as well as an introduction to hydraulics and pneumatics. Students will be exposed to the safe use of tools, processes and selection of relevant materials whilst making a working model of a hydraulic crane controlled by a hydraulic sytem. Testing and evaluation of learning outcomes along with the application of STEM will be applied.

Product Design

In Year 7 students will be introduced to the Health & Safety aspects of working in a workshop. They will also study the work of Italian company Alessi and receive a design brief that offers them the opportunity to make a product ' that meets the Alessi ethos. Students will be introduced into the different types of timber and how to safely use a broad range of hand / machine tools. The emphasis of this project will be meeting the design brief and making a high quality outcome. 

Textiles

The project aims to introduce students to textiles and smart materials, whilst also developing work covered in Key Stages 2/3 Science and maths. Students’ knowledge and understanding is further enhanced by exploring thermochromic, photochromic and phosphorescent dyes. This is blended with textile design skills of printing, shibori (3D) and use of hand sewing. The skills learnt are; research, design, printing or surface techniques and sewing skills, as well as the theory behind smart materials, fibres and fabric introduction.

Year 8

Food Technology

Food Around the World
Food Technology in year 8 looks at building on basic cooking skills by cooking a range of typical dishes from around the world including pizza pinwheels, chilli con carne, stir fry and fresh pasta with homemade pesto. We revisit health and safety and learn more about food poisoning, explore world cuisine, understand the impact of food miles on our environment and compare healthy eating models in different countries.

Engineering

Students will learn about Elon musk, Tesla and SpaceX with a focus on new & emerging technologies. Topics such as renewable energy, fossil fuels, CAD/CAM  and sustainability will be covered before further developing their skills in coding and applying this to the development of a driverless car. Line sensors, light sensors, sonar, lights and sounds will be programed before testing and evaluating outcomes. Students will research mechanical and electrical engineering with a focus of how this is applied in different communities. 

Product Design

In Year 8 students will be review the Health & Safety aspects of working in a workhop. They will also study the work of British Architecture & Product Designer, Zaha Hadid and receive a design brief that offers them the opportunity to make a product ' that meets the Hadid ethos. Students will be introduced Computer Aided Design (CAD) & Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) as well as developing their Year 7 knowledge of different types of timber and how to safely use a broad range of hand / machine tools. The emphasis of this project will be meeting the design brief and making a high quality outcome.

Textiles

The project aims to introduce students to simple e-textiles and sustainability in garment and textiles manufacture. Students will use a culture of their choice to produce a repeat pattern on CAD on Vilene for their lamp. 
The theory section (50%) of the rotation compliments the practical. Students learn about how e-textiles are used in textiles and sustainability in the textiles and fashion industry. We explore fibre and fabric production and develop knowledge from year 7 on natural, synthetic and renewable fibres. Students will also develop their design skills furthers around the design aspect of DT.

Year 9

Food Technology

Food, Diet and Lifestyle
Food Technology in year 9 looks at developing an understanding of the impact diet and lifestyle has on our health and well-being. We revisit health, safety, and food poisoning, understand energy balance, food labelling and marketing and consider how farming effects the environment and our health. We explore recipe modification, healthy cooking methods and how diet influences our well-being. Students learn to cook a variety of ‘fakeaways’ from sweet and sour chicken to curry and naan bread. 

Engineering

Students will apply previous learning outcomes in the development of a trebuchet made from timber. The applications of Maths and science (equations to calculate speed of the projectile, the distance the projectile travels and the physics behind a working model) will form the main STEM links along with transferal of momentum. Students will test their product, capture all relative data along the way and evaluate all outcomes including how they could better improve their outcomes should they have to remake their trebuchet. 

Product Design

In Year 9 students will be review the Health & Safety aspects of working in a workhop. Students will develop their Computer Aided Design (CAD) & Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) skills from Year 8 and consolidate their knowledge of timber from Year 7 & Year 8. In addition, students will also be introduced to working with metal; enamel and pewter casting.The emphasis of this project will be meeting the design brief and making a high quality outcome.

Textiles

The project aims to develop a range of skills, notably research, design and practical skills.  The project will also develop knowledge and understanding of the portfolio process. Students are given a design brief and will be learning how to design for a client with complex needs. Students will develop research skills and practise iterative design, before focusing on practical skills; decorative techniques, particularly printing and embroidery.  Knowledge and understanding of joining methods and processes will also be covered.  Students will be shown to use a range of design development and presentation techniques.  CAD can be used in the development of designs and CAM may be used during manufacture.

Key Stage 4

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

Year 10

Term 1

Food Processing and production 
This term students will start with a brief introduction of the 5 core topics and expectations of the course. Students will then study the following key topics:
• This term will focus on food processing and production 
• Use a variety of practical skills
• Demonstrate safe working practices
• Food presentation and garnishes
• Meat and fish preparation
Practical Introduction to higher level practical skills

Term 2

Food choice and food provenance
This term students will be studying:
· Factors affecting food choice
· British and International Cuisines
· Sensory evaluation
· Environmental impact and sustainability
Practical: Development of higher level practical skills

Term 3

Food safety
This term students will be studying:
· Microorganisms and enzymes 
· Signs of food spoilage 
· Microorganisms in food production 
· Bacterial contamination 
· Buying and storing food
· Preparing, cooking and serving food 
Practical: Further development of higher level practical skills 
Introduction to NEA 1: Food Science Investigations

Term 4

Food Nutrition and Health
This term students will be studying:
· Protein
· Fats
· Carbohydrates
· Vitamins, minerals and water
· Eatwell guide and lifestages
· Special dietary needs
· Energy needs
Practical: Demonstration of higher level practical skills
Introduction to NEA 2: Food Practical

Term 5

Food Science
This term students will be studying:
· Heat transfer and cooking methods
· Functional and chemical properties: protein
· Functional and chemical properties: carbohydrates
· Functional and chemical properties: fats
· Functional and chemical properties: raising agents
Consolidation of higher level practical skills
NEA 2: Mock practical exam (3hours)

Year 11

Term 1

This term students will complete their NEA 1, which is worth 15% of their overall GCSE grade.
Students will be required to plan and undertake written tasks in response to a set task.  When completing their NEA1 students will need to pay attention to SPAG.  It is essential that students acquire and correctly use technical and subject terminology and vocabulary.

Term 2

This term students will begin their NEA 2 (20 hour assessment) which is worth 35% of their overall GCSE grade. Students will be required to plan and undertake written tasks in response to a set task.  When completing their NEA2 students will need to pay attention to SPAG.  It is essential that students acquire and correctly use technical and subject terminology and vocabulary. Students will complete their practical skills trials.

Term 3

This term students will complete their NEA 2 (20 hour assessment) which is worth 35% of their overall GCSE grade. Students will be required to plan and undertake written tasks in response to a set task.  When completing their NEA2 students will need to pay attention to SPAG.  It is essential that students acquire and correctly use technical and subject terminology and vocabulary. Students will complete their 3 hour practical exam and a written mock exam.

Term 4

This term students will complete a variety of revision activities to prepare them for their final written exam worth 50% of their GCSE

GCSE Product Design

Year 10

Term 1

This term the students will be introduced to the Product Design GCSE and will begin learning a mix of the core theory and Timber Specialism. They will be introduced to different drawing techniques, practical skills and equipment. As well as the emerging technologies used in industry and a range of designers from a range of design specialisms.

Term 2

This term students will complete a mini NEA. The real NEA comes live at the end of term 5, so this vital practice. To accompany this portfolio, students will complete a practical task. The theory lessons will focus on design strategies and understanding timbers and other product design materials.

Term 3

This term students will complete The Star Pack challenge. This is a fantastic competition, judged by designers in the product design industry. It will give the students another chance to practice designing before the NEA in term 5. The theory lessons will focus on materials in the core section of the theory knowledge. Such as metals and paper and board.

Term 4

This term students will make a busy board, using a range of processes and materials in the workshop to ensure they are fully confident in their making skills. Theory for this term will include core and timber specialisms to complete theory learning.

Term 5

At the beginning of term 5 students will be reminded that the NEA is worth 50% of final GCSE grade. With the written exam at the end of year 11 is worth the other 50%.

This term students will begin their NEA. Students should complete section 1.1 and 1.2 before the summer holidays commence. These sections are research and investigation 1.1 and Specification 1.2. Theory will be now recapped through lesson activities and quizzes throughout the term

Year 11

Term 1

At the beginning of year 11 students will be reminded that the NEA is worth 50% of final GCSE grade. With the written exam at the end of year 11 is worth the other 50%. 

This term the students will working NEA. Section 2.1. Initial design ideas, 2.2 Review of design ideas and section 2.3 Development of design ideas into a final design, Includes modelling and use of CAD. Students will working independently through these tasks and given generalised feedback and guidance by their teacher. The theory covered will be as homework and shorter activities in lessons to revise and ensure retention of knowledge.

Term 2

This term the students will continue with section 2.3 Development of design ideas into a final design, including modelling and use of CAD, section 2.5 and review of final design.  Students will working independently through these tasks and given generalised feedback and guidance by their teacher. The theory covered will be as homework and shorter activities in lessons to revise and ensure retention of knowledge.

Term 3

This term the students will be in the making and evaluating (completion) parts of the NEA. These are sections:  3.1a Selection of materials, 3.1 b Skills and processes, 3.1c Quality and Accuracy and finally 4. Evaluation.  Students will working independently through these tasks and given generalised feedback and guidance by their teacher. The theory covered will be as homework and shorter activities in lessons to revise and ensure retention of knowledge.

Term 4

This term students will continue making and completion of NEA as in term 3. We will then move to revision for the written exam, which is worth the other 50% of the final GCSE grade.

GCSE Textiles

Year 10

Term 1

This term the students will be introduced to the Textile Design GCSE and will begin learning a mix of the core theory and Textiles Specialism. They will be introduced to different drawing techniques, practical skills and equipment. As well as the emerging technologies used in industry and a range of designers from a range of design specialisms.

Term 2

This term students will complete a mini NEA. The real NEA comes live at the end of term 5, so this vital practice. To accompany this portfolio, students will complete a practical task. The theory lessons will focus on design strategies and understanding textiles materials, to ensure that they are able to utilise the correct tools, processes and techniques for their chosen designs

Term 3

This term students will complete a mini NEA. The real NEA comes live at the end of term 5, so this vital practice. To accompany this portfolio, students will complete a practical task. The theory lessons will focus on design strategies and understanding textiles materials, to ensure that they are able to utilise the correct tools, processes and techniques for their chosen designs

Term 4

This term students will gain confidence in surface design (printing, dyeing and other decorative techniques) as well as paper pattern making. This is an important skill to practise, students will use range of processes and materials in the workshop to ensure they are fully confident in these skills. Theory for this term will include core and textiles specialisms to complete theory learning.

Term 5

At the beginning of term 5 students will be reminded that the NEA is worth 50% of final GCSE grade. With the written exam at the end of year 11 is worth the other 50%.

This term students will begin their NEA. Students should complete section 1.1 and 1.2 before the summer holidays commence. These sections are research and investigation 1.1 and Specification 1.2. Theory will be now recapped through lesson activities and quizzes throughout the term

Year 11

Term 1

At the beginning of year 11 students will be reminded that the NEA is worth 50% of final GCSE grade. With the written exam at the end of year 11 is worth the other 50%. 

This term the students will working NEA. Section 2.1. Initial design ideas, 2.2 Review of design ideas and section 2.3 Development of design ideas into a final design, Includes modelling and use of CAD. Students will working independently through these tasks and given generalised feedback and guidance by their teacher. The theory covered will be as homework and shorter activities in lessons to revise and ensure retention of knowledge.

Term 2

This term the students will continue with section 2.3 Development of design ideas into a final design, including modelling and use of CAD, section 2.5 and review of final design.  Students will working independently through these tasks and given generalised feedback and guidance by their teacher. The theory covered will be as homework and shorter activities in lessons to revise and ensure retention of knowledge.

Term 3

This term the students will be in the making and evaluating (completion) parts of the NEA. These are sections:  3.1a Selection of materials, 3.1 b Skills and processes, 3.1c Quality and Accuracy and finally 4. Evaluation.  Students will working independently through these tasks and given generalised feedback and guidance by their teacher. The theory covered will be as homework and shorter activities in lessons to revise and ensure retention of knowledge.

Term 4

This term students will continue making and completion of NEA as in term 3. We will then move to revision for the written exam, which is worth the other 50% of the final GCSE grade.

NCFE Engineering

Year 10

Term 1

Students will understand the following engineering disciplines, how they have shaped our world and what they involve: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and electronic engineering, Aerospace engineering, Communications Engineering, Chemical engineering, Civil engineering, Automotive engineering, Biomedical engineering and Software engineering.

Term 2

Students will understand how science and maths are applied in engineering, Health & safety legislation and how to read engineering drawings. Students will work through this both theoretically via their NCFE Engineering workbook that they are issued with and practically within our workshops here at school. Students will be encouraged to work together in teams to overcome engineering challenges in order to develop the necessary skills of problem solving and team work.

Term 3

Students will gain knowledge in the following areas: Properties and characteristics of engineering materials and know why specific materials are selected for engineering applications, engineering tools, equipment and machines. Students will again work through this both theoretically via their NCFE Engineering workbook that they are issued with and practically within our workshops here at school. Students will be encouraged to work together in teams to overcome engineering challenges in order to develop the necessary skills of problem solving and team work.

Term 4

Students will learn to produce hand-drawn engineering drawings, Computer Aided Design (CAD) engineering drawings, demonstrate production planning techniques, demonstrate processing skills and techniques applied to materials for a manufacturing task and produce a risk assessment. . Students will again work through this both theoretically via their NCFE Engineering workbook that they are issued with and practically by gaining experience on computer software.

Term 5

Students will use the knowledge and skills gained over the course of the year to answer a Mock Engineering brief. They will be required to produce a portfolio of evidence while answering this brief along the way developing the necessary skills needed to complete the practical segment of the level 1/2 Engineering qualification.

Year 11

Term 1

• Application of course content covered in year 10.
• Focus on Engineering drawings
• Practical development of engineering skills.
• Overview of past synoptic challenges and their layout.
  Understanding Unit 2.

Term 2

•     Application of course content covered in year 10.
•     Material testing and data collecting.
•     Overview of past synoptic challenges and their layout.
       Testing and selection of materials.

Term 3

Students will be working on their Synoptic task set out by NCFE. This task makes up 60% of their overall grade for this qualification. The task will be completed within lesson time on the school premises. Students will complete this task independently using all the knowledge and experience gained over the course of this qualification.

Term 4

Students will be completing work on their Synoptic task set out by NCFE and handing it in for grading. This task makes up 60% of their overall grade for this qualification. The task will be completed within lesson time on the school premises. Students will complete this task independently using all the knowledge and experience gained over the course of this qualification.

Key Stage 5

Year 12

Term 1

In Term 1 students are introduced to the NEA Coursework and required to consider/ select potential real life clients and investigate their wants/need for the main focus of their coursework. In addition, students will study the major design movements of the 20th Century and review their impact on design today. Students will also develop their product design communication skills and learn how to critically evaluate products. Focus will also be applied to literacy and numeracy skills to meet the rigours of the mock and examination requirements

Term 2

In Term 2 students participate in a national recognised Product Design competition to hone their presentation skills and meet an externally set design brief set by a real company. This opportunity enables students to compete alongside Russell Group Product / Industrial design graduates and potentially win a national award. In addition, students consolidate their existing knowledge of Paper / Boards, Textiles and Smart Materials, and understand the performance characteristics of the aforementioned materials. Students will be finalising their chosen clients’ needs and wants, and researching the work of other designers / architects in their chosen field.

Term 3

In Term 3 students will undertake a series of high level focused practical tasks around alloying-heat treatments-casting-machining moulding. They will learn how to use specialist-measuring tools and practice permanent and semi-permanent joining techniques. Students will develop their 2D & 3D design skills, learning how to communicate like an industrial designer and use various design software and apps. They will begin an intensive process of iteration, and will need to be willing to share, critique and present their own ideas to their peers in the forms of ‘Crits’.

Term 4

In Term 4 Students will continue to develop their 2D & 3D design skills. They will continue an intensive process of iteration, in developing their 3D modelling techniques using card, foam and digital media. They will need to be willing to share, critique and present their own ideas to their peers in the forms of ‘Crits’. This is one of the highest scoring criteria of their NEA, so students are expected to utilise their free periods in the workshop, developing their iterative ideas.

Term 5

In Term 5 students will investigate how User Centred Design, ergonomic and anthropometrics informs their NEA. Students will begin presenting their final design idea to their client and responding to their client’s direct feedback. NEA portfolio will now show a rich development of CAD / CAM testing, digital and hand draughtsmanship, plus clear iteration in meeting the clients wants and needs. Work completed here is often used for future university / apprenticeship submissions and portfolios.

Year 13

Term 1

In Term 1 students investigate modern manufacturing methods and systems for small, medium and large-scale production. Understanding how quality-monitoring systems are used in manufacturing. Students begin testing, developing and modelling their final design idea. Frequent clients feedback, peer to peer presenting and constructive criticism testing the students design ideas and strengthens their overall NEA Portfolio.

Term 2

In Term 2 students investigate designing for maintenance and a cleaner environment. Looking also at current legislation-consumer rights-Health & Safety at Work Act. During their NEA, students construct their final solution that meets the client’s wants and needs. Students are expected to manage and utilise their free periods to be in the work shop and meet their production deadlines. They will continue an intensive process of iteration, focusing on detail, finishing and willing to share, critique and present their own work to their peers in the forms of ‘Crits’.

Term 3

In Term 3 students will investigate intellectual property rights for designers-such as copyrights-patents-trademarks and design rights. They will also understand the standards involved when developing and manufacturing work-such as British Standards-International Standards and other standard labels. In preparation for the mock paper, students also study Maths is DT, with a focus on trigonometry and how applied in exam questions. NEA practical work will be completed and ready to be presented to client for final feedback

Term 4

In Term 4 students focus on project management strategies such as CPA-SCRUM-Six Sigma and stages of a products life cycle. This forms part of their final NEA section in evaluation and life cycle analysis. Further exam preparation is undertaken and students complete NEA Portfolio ready of submission.

The Team

Jonathan Browne

Assistant Principal

Teacher of Design Technology
jbrowne@brookeweston.org

Natasha Chiremba

Head of Department

Teacher of Food Technology
nchiremba@brookeweston.org

Selina Moore

Teacher of Textiles and DT
smoore@brookeweston.org

Gareth Van Wyk

Teacher of Design Technology
gvanwyk@brookeweston.org

Darren Hooper

Design Technology Technician
dhooper@brookeweston.org

Ruth McKinnell

Food Technician
rmckinnell@brookeweston.org

   

 

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