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Humanities Department

The humanities are traditional subjects which are held in high regard as academic disciplines and are therefore looked upon very favourably by both employers and universities.

For detailed information on specifications refer to the Key Stage 4 or Key Stage 5 prospectus.

The humanities department offers GCSEs in Geography, History and religious studies. These subjects develop our knowledge and understanding of human behaviour and its consequences for others and the world we live in. They teach us to appreciate different cultures and beliefs and to understand the world around us. In addition, religious studies may be taken as an optional subject in which you will consider the beliefs and practises of two religions, investigate ethical and philosophical issues and gain knowledge and understanding to make your own informed decisions.

The Humanities department offers a range of humanities and social science subjects at GCE A Level. The A Level subjects taught in the department are traditional subjects which are held in high regard as academic disciplines and are, therefore, looked upon very favourably by both employers and universities. All Humanities subjects focus on human behaviour and experience and through studying them you will gain knowledge and understanding of different cultures and beliefs and a better understanding of current world issues. They also develop essential study skills, such as critical and creative thinking, debating and evaluating

Humanities Intent

In the Humanities faculty we provide a knowledge rich and rigorous academic curriculum underpinned by high expectations which empowers students with an understanding of their sense of place in the world as global citizens. Led by curiosity, students will be a part of a generation ready to make positive change through their critical analysis of global, complex and contemporary issues, processes of change, the journey of humanity and their responsibility for the future of society. Students will develop a deep and rich understanding of identity, diversity and their sense of self enabling them to evaluate and debate challenging enquiries and engage in enrichment opportunities across the breadth of Humanities subjects.

The Curriculum

BPE

Education enables students to grow and fulfil their potential, not only in an intellectual sense but as human beings in all their complexity. At the heart of BPE is the human experience of lived religions and worldviews across the major six religions and other worldviews such as Humanism. BPE explores how these faiths are expressed across time such as through the narrative of the Abrahamic faiths. At A level this is explored through the topic of Development in Christian Thought, supporting the idea of religion being a changing narrative over time. An example of how these are lived religions and worldviews is shown through the cultural relevance of the Dharamic religions and the influence this has had on the world. In BPE, students of all faiths and none explore questions of meaning, purpose and value, and are encouraged to reflect critically on their own thoughts and beliefs and those of others, drawing on the wisdom of religions and world views. Challenging topics such as, war, poverty, human rights, relationships amongst others are explored through application of religions and views. This is crucially reflected through enquiry questions that relate to these worldviews being living practices and beliefs. As pupils progress through to KS5 pupils will explore philosophical ideas of both religion and ethics and how these apply to the world around us, challenging themselves. As future citizens of a diverse society and globalised world, students need the tools and knowledge to co-exist peacefully and considerately with others, to listen empathetically and to disagree respectfully. This is supported through enquiry into different religions and world views, students are facilitated to break down ignorance and stereotypes.

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Term 1 - What is it like to follow a Jewish way of life in Britain and the world today?

Pupils will start their study at Brooke Weston Academy in Beliefs Philosophy and Ethics on the religion and world view of Judaism. This follows on pupils completing their study of RE at primary school and builds on this.  During this first term of study in Year 7 pupils will engage with scholarship and how Judaism is a living world view. Throughout this first term pupils will look at the concept of God, key figures, holy texts and places of worship. Lessons draw comparisons to different views and how this challenges people. Throughout the study of Beliefs Philosophy and Ethics at Brooke Weston pupils will start to understand that religions are living world views which people will engage with and this first unit is important in understanding that. 

Term 2 - What is it like to follow a Jewish way of life in Britain and the world today?

Pupils will continue to study Judaism throughout this term. Building upon what has been learnt in the prior term pupils will be able to clearly demonstrate understanding and depth of knowledge through a long term study of a world religion. During this term pupils will apply their knowledge and understanding to the theme of religious views on war. By looking at scripture from the Torah pupils will interpret what influence this has over Jews about their attitudes towards war, peace and conflict. This creates a depth of understanding and supports pupils in seeing this religion as a living worldview through application to this theme. 

Term 3 - Christianity as a living religion: What relevance does Christianity have in modern Britain?

Throughout this term students will explore the faith of Christianity. Students will develop an understanding of how Christianity relates to modern Britain today. Pupils will explore the support the church offers in times of crisis and how it has shaped Britain and its values. Students will then apply their study of Christianity to the theme of poverty and wealth which will enable pupils to demonstrate their understanding of the relevance of Christianity in Modern Britain. 

Term 4 - How do key beliefs and teachings influence Muslims worldwide?

During term 4 pupils will start to study the faith of Islam. During this term pupils will study the Islamic faith and important foundation knowledge that underpins this religion. Pupils will look at Allah and His qualities, the significance of various prophets and their influence on Islam moving the religion into the world view it is today. By studying these topics it provides pupils with a broad view and provides pupils ample opportunities to see Islam as a living religion and how these beliefs influence people who follow the religion. This is further cemented by a study into the 5 pillars of Sunni Islam underpinned by scholarship and a study into the importance and the influence this has on Sunni Muslims. 

Term 5 - How do key beliefs and teachings influence Muslims worldwide?

Pupils will continue to study Islam and look at Muslim places of worship and the international community of Muslims. Through looking at case studies and placing Islam into a living belief system, it will ensure that students are able to engage with the theological study of Islam and develop an understanding of the practice of Islam. Students will then apply religious beliefs to the theme of war and religious beliefs about war. It will look at and compare Muslim attitudes to Jewish attitudes to war through the study of the holy texts. 

Year 8

Term 1 - What is the true meaning of Buddhism?

During this term in year 8 pupils will start their study into Buddhism and exploring the meaning of Buddhism. This builds on the scholarship skills embedded in Year 7. By looking at Buddhism through a critical lens it supports pupils to explore Buddhism with an open eye comparing it to the Abrahamic faiths. Pupils look at the personhood of Buddha, the holy text, the four Noble Truths, places of worship and the 8 fold path. Through these topics it allows pupils to have a broad sense of the meaning of Buddhism challenging misconceptions and what beliefs are. 

Term 2 - What is the true meaning of Buddhism? and What is it like to be a Sikh?

Pupils will finish their study of Buddhism during this term. By applying their knowledge to the theme of poverty and wealth pupils are able to understand some of the meaning behind Buddhism and how it is a living religion. This theme is applied to support pupils knowledge from the prior learning of applying this theme to Christianity. 
Pupils will then move on to their study of Sikhism. Pupils will start to engage with the key beliefs of Sikhism and how this influences their worldview. Through looking at the beliefs pupils will engage with how this effects the day to day lives of those followers of the faith. These include key beliefs about God and the Gurus and the influence this had on others. 

Term 3 - What is it like to be a Sikhi?

Pupils will continue and conclude their study of Sikhism during this term. Pupils will look at the influences the 5Ks have on followers of the faith and how some followers of the faith live their lives. This allows pupils to have a depth of understanding of 'what it is like to be a Sikh?' Through case studies and the influence this has on followers of the faith pupils will be able to conclude what is it to be a Sikh. 

Term 4 - How do Hindus live their lives interpreting scripture? / How do Humanists conclude what is a good decision?

Pupils will study the faith of Hinduism. Pupils will look at the key beliefs, teachings and practices. This is underpinned by looking at scripture and an in depth study into the importance of scripture. Through looking closely at scripture pupils will develop from prior topics the importance of scripture and how this translates to day to day living of Hindus. 

Students will begin to study the beliefs in Humanism. Pupils will explore the origins of morality and whether this is a secular or non-secular value.  Pupils will look at what is the purpose behind life and how others find meaning of lives. 

Term 5 -  How do Humanists conclude what is a good decision?

Throughout this term pupils will continue with their study of Humanism. Pupils will explore God’s existence, looking at arguments both for and against the existence of God. Through looking at this with critical lenses, pupils will explore their own and others arguments both for and against the existence of God. This study will develop pupil’s ability to be critical of information and accepting of others beliefs. 

Year 9

Term 1 - Christian Beliefs and teachings 

During this term pupils will start their study of the GCSE RE content. The content will build on prior learning and the platform given in KS2 and Year 7 and 8. Pupils will engage with the nature of a Christian God, how Great Britian is a Christian country and the nature of role of humans. Pupils will study these topics to provide a foundation of knowledge into their study of RE. The content will build and challenge the views of pupils through scripture and different denominational beliefs. 

Term 2 - Christian Beliefs and teachings

Pupils during this term will continue to study Christian beliefs and teachings. This will build on what has been studied last term. Pupils will look at Jesus' life, how Christians suggest we can be saved, the afterlife and judgement. These topics challenge pupils and their beliefs. By engaging with scripture, denominational belief. These topics link to prior learning and allow pupils to make links to other faiths. Again as with other units the key theme is that this is a living belief system and how this effects believers and the United Kingdom.

Term 3 - Issues of life and death 

During this term pupils will apply their study of Christianity and Islam to the theme of issues of life and death. This unit consists of challenging topics such as; looking after the earth, attitudes to the environment, euthanasia, abortion, life after death and funerals. These topics are addressed in a sensitive manner which are delivered to support pupils understanding and knowledge. These topics allow pupils to explore their own belief and beliefs of others. Pupils again will look at scripture in addition to scholars and worldviews on these topics. By looking at a breadth of views on these it allows pupils to substantiate their own opinions, understand views other than their own and look at other world views. These all provide pupils with a depth of understanding. 

Term 4 - Issues of life and death and issues of Human Rights 

Pupils will complete their study of issues of life and death. Completing an assessment to substantiate their knowledge. 

Pupils will then start the study of Human Rights looking at Christian and Muslim attitudes to social justice, personal conviction, liberation theology, censorship, religious expression, prejudice, discrimination, and poverty and wealth. These topics are studied through real life case studies and how Christians put their beliefs into action. Pupils again will explore these beliefs through different denominations. These topics again are shown respectfully with pupils empowered to challenge views of others and their own views through this thematic study.  

Term 5 - Christian Practices 

During this term pupils will further their study into Christianity. Pupils will study Christian practices these include; forms of worship, prayer, sacraments, diversity of beliefs about sacraments, pilgrimages and celebrations. This further study of Christianity will support pupils deep understanding of Christianity as a religion and a worldview. Pupils will explore why these practices are important to Christians and how they are performed. 

Key Stage 4

Year 10

Term 1 - Issues of life and death 

During this term pupils will apply their study of Christianity to the theme of issues of life and death. This unit consists of challenging topics such as; looking after the earth and attitudes to the environment. These topics are addressed through case studies and real life examples of how Christians and other faiths look after the world. This will support pupils in understanding how Christianity is a living belief and world view that will influence actions of Christians. 

Term 2  - Issues of life and death 

Pupils will continue to study the theme of issues of life and death including; euthanasia, abortion, life after death and funerals. These topics are addressed in a sensitive manner These topics allow pupils to explore their own beliefs and beliefs of others. Pupils will look at scripture in addition to scholars and worldviews on these topics. By looking at a breadth of views on these it allows pupils to substantiate their own opinions, understand views other than their own and look at other world views. These all provide pupils with a depth of understanding. 

Term 3 - Issues of Human Rights

Pupils will commence their study of Human Rights during this term. Pupils will study the topics of; Human rights and linked to social justice, personal convictions and Human Rights, censorship, freedom of religious expression. These topics are delivered through looking at case studies. Again this reinforces the idea that religions and worldviews impact people on a day to day basis. This topic allows pupils to discuss and engage with Human Rights building on understanding from Citizenship and Personal Development. 

Term 4 - Issues of Human  Rights 

Pupils will continue to study the theme of Issues of Human Rights, pupils will look at the topics of; freedom of religion, discrimination, prejudice, racism and attitudes to poverty and wealth. These topics are explored sensitively with a wide worldview. Through studying these topics it places pupils understanding of Christianity into a real life worldview. 

Term 5 - Good and Evil 

During this term pupils will study the topic of good and evil. During this term pupils will look at Chrstian attitudes towards punishment, causes of crime, the death penalty, forgiveness and forgiveness. These challenging topics build on topics studied in Citizenship and Personal Development in KS3. These links are made to further pupils understanding creating a well-rounded view. 

Year 11

Term 1 - Issues of relationships and Issues of life and death 

Pupils will start their study of the themes working towards their GCSE. Pupils will undertake the study of the theme of relationships. Pupils will apply their knowledge of Islam and Christianity. Pupils will study; nature and purpose of relationships, marriage, cohabitation, divorce, same sex relationships, attitudes to contraception and attitudes to the role of women. These topics are explored to challenge pupils opinions and explore the opinions of others. 

During this term pupils will apply their study of Christianity to the theme of issues of life and death. This unit consists of challenging topics such as; looking after the earth and attitudes to the environment. These topics are addressed through case studies and real life examples of how Christians and other faiths look after the world. This will support pupils in understanding how Christianity is a living belief and world view that will influence actions of Christians. 

Term 2 - Issues of life and death and Issues of Good and Evil 

Pupils will continue to study the theme of issues of life and death including; euthanasia, abortion, life after death and funerals. These topics are addressed in a sensitive manner These topics allow pupils to explore their own beliefs and beliefs of others. Pupils will look at scripture in addition to scholars and worldviews on these topics. By looking at a breadth of views on these it allows pupils to substantiate their own opinions, understand views other than their own and look at other world views. These all provide pupils with a depth of understanding. 

Pupils will study the theme of issues of good and evil in this term. Pupils will study; crime, causes of crime, death penalty, forgiveness, personal beliefs, origin of evil and free will and suffering. These topics are explored, as with all the themes, sensitively and respecting of others. These will be studied through different lenses such as through sociological, theological and historical to demonstrate a depth of understanding beyond simply just scripture. 

Term 3 - Issues of Human Rights and revision 


Pupils will then start the study of Human Rights looking at Christian attitudes to social justice, personal conviction, liberation theology, censorship, religious expression, prejudice, discrimination, and poverty and wealth. These topics are studied through real life case studies and how Christians put their beliefs into action. Pupils again will explore these beliefs through different denominations. These topics again are shown respectfully with pupils empowered to challenge views of others and their own views through this thematic study.  

Term 4

Pupils will continue to engage with revision as their GCSE exam is at the end of this term during the May holidays. 

Key Stage 5

Year 12

Term 1

Pupils will start their study of philosophy and ethics in the whole of year 12 studying the topics of ethics and philosophy of religion. 

Within ethics pupils will start to look at different normative ethical theories. Pupils will study the topics of natural law and Situation Ethics. These topics are underpinned by scholarship, theological study and academic rigour. Within Natural law pupils grapple with what is our purpose is through 'telos', whether there are tiers of law which unfluence the natural order of the world and whether we all follow the key precept of doing good and avoiding evil. Within the topic of situation ethics pupils consdier the meaning of agape and whether or not that the best outcome of a moral decision is the most loving action. 

In philoophy of religion pupils study ancient philosophical influences. In this topic pupils will look at the philosophical views of Plate and Aristotle. Pupils will compare their views of reality and how reality can be considered. Pupils will also consider their concepts of God and what they are. 

Term 2

Pupils within the ethics unit will look at the normative ethcial theories of Utilitarianism and Kantian ethics. Within these units pupils will consider what is meant by duty, whether the best outcome is when the majority are successful. The pupils will consider the challenges with these theories providing an indepth study of the long term effects of ethical moral decision making. This is underpinned by looking at the texts and engaging with the meaning of morals


In philosophy of religion pupils will look at the topics of soul, mind and body and arguments based on observation. Pupils will deepen their understanding of philosophy through these units. By contemplating the reality of our soul and whether it exists. In addition pupils will look at arguments based on observation and arguments based on reason which includes; the teleological argument, the cosomological arguemnt and the ontological argument. These topics allow pupils to critically analyse the existence of God. 

Term 3

Pupils will continue to study normative ehtical theories in relation to euthanasia. Pupils will apply the normative ethical theories of natural law and situation ethics to euthanasia. By applying the normative ethical theories to a topic such as euthanasia it really allows pupils to grapple with the practical application of normative ethical theories. By critically engaging with the theories in application pupils will form reasoned opinions.


In philosophy of religion pupils will study the topics of religious experience and the problem of evil. These two topics allow pupils to engage with the philosophical aspects of the existence of God. Through this study pupils will build on what has been studied during KS4, this provides pupils to engage with challenging questions such as; does the problem of evil disprove the existence of God and does a religious experience prove the existence of God. 

Term 4

 During this term pupils will continue with their study of the ethics and philosophy of religion. Within the ethics unit pupils will study the application of normative ethical theories to the topic of business ethics and apply normative ethical theories to key ideas within business. Pupils will also look at meta-ethics. This is looking at the concept of what ‘good’ is. This will allow pupils to critically evaluate the issues surrounding varying interpretations of the ideas of ‘good’. 

Pupils will also explore the philosophy of religion and specifically explore what is considered to be the nature or attributes of God. Pupils will explore the developments in understanding of omnipotence, omniscience, omnibenevolence, eternity and free will in relation to the attributes God. 

Term 5

During this term pupils will continue with their study of the ethics and philosophy of religion. Within the ethics unit pupils will study theological and psychological approaches to the conscience and applying normative ethical theories to sexual ethics. Pupils will explore the approach of Aquinas and compare this to Freud’s approach to conscience. Pupils will then explore their own ideas about where their own conscience comes from. In the sexual ethics unit pupils will apply the normative ethical theories they studied previously with consideration to the ideas on; premarital and extramarital sex and homosexuality. Pupils will also consider the influence on the developments in religious beliefs and practices on debates about morality, legality and tolerability of sexual ethics. 

Within the module ‘Philosophy of Religion’ pupils will engage with the ideas around religious language whether is it negative, analogical or symbolic. This will look at the application of theological language to the application of God as well as the language of religious expression. Pupils will then move on to look at Twentieth century perspectives and philosophical comparisons. This will draw comparisons to previous study at the start of the year when pupils studied ancient philosophical influences. 

Year 13

Term 1

Pupils will study the content in the Development in Christian Thought module. Pupils will start by studying Augustine's Teaching on Human Nature. Pupils will consider Human relationships pre and post fall, the effect of the original sin and God's grace. This topic is important for pupils to understand as they underpin the rest of the content in Development in Christian Thought. After pupils will study the concept of death and the afterlife. This module looks at denominational beliefs and the subtleties of this. Through looking closely at scripture and how these inform beliefs it provides pupils with an opportunity to engage with theological debates. Pupils towards the end of term will study knowledge of God's existence. This creates an important synoptic link to other topics across the course creating synchronicity.

Term 2

Pupils will continue to study the module of Development in Christian Thought during this term. Pupils will look at the person of Jesus, this will build on knowledge gained throughout prior study during KS3 and KS4. Pupils will consider Jesus' authority in relation to him being the Son of God, a teacher of wisdom and a liberator. Through this study of Jesus as a source of authority it provides students with the challenge to grapple with a concept that has challenged theologians for centuries. Pupils will then start to study Christian moral principles. Pupils will engage with where morality comes from  a Christian precedent and the diversity of morality. 

Pupils will also then start to consider the ideas of religious pluralism and theology. The teaching of contemporary theology of religion. This topic allows pupils to consider whether salvation can be achieved for all or some Christians. Pupils will also look at the ideas of religious pluralism and society. How multi-faith societies develop and why they develop and Christian responses to challenges facing Christianity. Pupils will start to look at gender and society and the effects of Gender in Christianity. 

Term 3

Pupils will conclude their study of the As modules through the study of Christian moral actions. Pupils will study the life of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the idea of discipleship. They will look at the Bonhoeffer's teaching on the relationship of the Church and the State. Through this study of his life pupils will look at the devotion of some moral actions. 

Pupils will continue to study gender and Christianity through society and theology. Pupils will consider the role of gender in the church and what implications this has on societal norms. These topics will clearly refer to scripture and the denominational beliefs about the role of women. In addition pupils will study the challenge and rise of secularism. Pupils will grapple with the ideas which secularism has arisen in direct challenge to faith. During the final topic pupils will study liberation theology and Marx. The relationship between Marx and theology is important in the development of theology in the 21st century. By grappling with these ideas it provides and accumulation of knowledge across the specification. 

Term 4

During this term pupils will start a targeted course of study which supports students revision of previous topics studied in year 12 and 13. Pupils will revisit the units of Ethics, Philosophy of religion and Development in Christian thought modules. This will involve looking over the previous units to create clarity of the synoptic links over the course. 

Through continuous challenge the study will build up their confidence moving towards their A level examination.

Term 5

During this term pupils will continue with their revision. As pupils move closer towards their examination they will engage further in their revision. Through extensive support of pupils through a variety of activities pupils will be secure in their knowledge before they go into their three A level assessments.  

Geography

Our aim is to empower students to become passionate global citizens with a broad and profound knowledge of the changing and complex world they are part of. Due to the interconnectivity of our subject, we aspire for our geographers to be able to use their cartographical, critical and analytical skills beyond the classroom and are able to view challenges from a wide range of perspectives. This, coupled with enrichment opportunities, leads geographers to have a curiosity and compassion for humanity and the environment with a powerful sense of justice. 

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Unit 1 - Geographical Questions

Have you ever wondered where your energy comes from, where your waste goes or where clothes are made? Perhaps you’d like to know why natural hazards happen, why cities are growing all around the world or why bees are disappearing. 
This term students will answering a Big Geographical Question during every Geography lesson in order for them to learn about what our subject involves and more importantly, why Geography matters to them and why it is important in our everyday lives. 
In exploring these Big Geographical Questions, students will also learn fundamental skills for geographers including how to analyse texts, examine photographs, retrieve data from a choropleth map and how to plot data on to a scatter graph and bar chart. 

Unit 2 - Our local ecosystem

Now that we have studied examples from all around the world, it is time to take a look at our own local ecosystem in the Brooke Weston school grounds. Students will learn about the biotic and abiotic factors, the trophic levels and food chains all in our local ecosystem. Students will then investigate the impacts of both natural and human changes to local small-scale ecosystems. This unit also gives students the exciting opportunity to take part in geographical fieldwork by conducting an enquiry in our school grounds. By measuring biodiversity and footpath erosion using a quadrat, geographers will gain an understanding of primary data collection methods, working along a transect, and present their data with a scatter graph to show a relationship.

Unit 3 - Shaping our coasts

In this topic, geographers will gain the knowledge and understanding of the coastal processes (erosion, transportation and deposition) that shape our island. They will also learn about how these processes create amazing landforms such as headlands and bays. This unit is a good opportunity to learn about how the human and physical environment are interconnected by evaluating management strategies to protect the environment from coastal processes including a range of hard and soft engineering methods. Year 7 geographers will also have the opportunity to conduct their first off-site fieldwork in Hunstanton, UK and therefore build on their knowledge of data collection and presentation techniques.

Year 8

Unit 1 - Glaciers and Cold Environments

In this topic, students will learn about the location, characteristics and importance of polar and tundra environments. Geographers then learn about glaciers and how the processes within them shape our landscape. As glaciers hold one third of the world’s fresh water, it is important that we understand the threats facing them, including that of recent climate change as well as the different ways that they can be protected.

Unit 2 - Population

With the world’s population fast approaching 8 billion, there has never been a more important time to study population. In this topic, geographers will learn how to read a population pyramid as well as the Demographic Transition Model. Students will also look at population growth and aging populations through studying examples such as Nigeria and Germany before evaluating contrasting approaches to resource consumption including the views of Malthus and Boserup. 

Unit 3 - Our local place study: Corby

Here, students will investigate the flows of people and investment that have shaped their local place: Corby, UK. They will begin by learning about the history of industrialisation and deindustrialisation in Corby. They will then examine the impacts of migration and regeneration in changing the character of Corby. This scheme of learning also includes opportunities to improve geographical skills such as creating a flow line map of migration from Scotland and other European countries.

Unit 4 - Oceans

Geographers begin this term by learning about the formation of our earth and its oceans. Geographers then examine how we use the oceans and why they are important to us (even if we do not live near a coast!). After learning why we need our oceans, geographers will then learn about the various threats to oceans including rising sea levels, over fishing and coral bleaching. They then evaluate a variety of strategies to manage oceans sustainably.

Year 9

Unit 1 - Natural hazards

Have you ever wondered why there is a difference between a natural hazard and a natural disaster? This term we will be studying the earth’s structure and the different tectonic plate boundaries in order to understand why earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur. Students will be required to think like disaster managers as we study examples of volcanic eruptions and evaluate how the impacts of tectonic hazards can be reduced. 

Unit 2 - Global development

Have you ever wondered why there is a difference between a natural hazard and a natural disaster? This term we will be studying the earth’s structure and the different tectonic plate boundaries in order to understand why earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur. Students will be required to think like disaster managers as we study examples of volcanic eruptions and evaluate how the impacts of tectonic hazards can be reduced. 

Unit 3 - Global biomes

Here, students will learn about a range of exciting world biomes such as hot deserts, tropical rainforests, Mediterranean and savannah grassland. Students will study the biome’s location, climates, biodiversity and other characteristics as well as the amazing ways that flora and fauna have adapted to these unique environments. This topic is also another valuable opportunity to revisit the impacts of climate change on the world’s biomes and how we can expect them to change in future. 

Unit 4 - The Almighty Dollar

The Almighty Dollar is a non-fiction book by Darishni David, a British economist. Following the journey of a single US dollar, students will ‘travel’ around the world from the Us to China, to Nigeria then Russia. By exploring a geographical concept or issue in each place, students cover contemporary issues such as the global shift in manufacturing, oil extraction, ageing populations and migration. This scheme of learning is well liked as it allows geographers to apply their knowledge of their entire KS3 curriculum so far, so whether students are taking Geography further next year by taking the subject at GCSE or not, this is a highly useful and relevant topic. . 

Key Stage 4

Year 10

Unit 1 - Living World: Ecosystems

All animal and plant life is dependent on the ecosystem that it lives in. In this unit, geographers will study the interaction of both biotic and abiotic factors as well as the interdependence between them. These interactions will be modelled using food webs and the nutrient cycle, for example. Our example of an small-scale ecosystem is our Brooke Weston pond, which students will explore in the grounds in order to explore processes such as eutrophication and succession.

Unit 2 - Challenge of Natural Hazards: Tectonic Hazards 

As a civilisation, we have explored much more of our universe than what is beneath our feet. In this unit students will study the structure and movement of the earth and how this creates a hazardous environment for those settled nearby. Using two contrasting case studies, students explore the impact of these disasters and evaluate the response to these events. At Brooke Weston, students focus on the earthquake in Haiti (2010) and Tohoku (2011).

Unit 3 - Urban Issues and Challenges: Rio 

More than half of the world’s population live in urban environments. In this unit, geographers will explore the causes of the global trends in urbanisation before examining the regional, national and international importance of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Students will then evaluate the socio-economic opportunities as well as the environmental challenges of urban growth in Rio de Janeiro, before studying the strategies aiming to improve the conditions of Rio’s favelas.

Unit 4 - Living World: Tropical Rainforests 

Tropical rainforests cover almost 10% of our world, with a vast range of flora and fauna that are interdependent on each other. With this biome providing so many human uses such as medicines and livelihoods, and being essential for our survival, it is important for us to study in depth. Students study the location and importance of this global ecosystem, before analysing the human uses and then evaluating whether we will ever be able to protect tropical rainforests such as the Amazon, sustainably.

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 5 - Urban Issues and Challenges: Leicester 

Cities are growing all around the world and Leicester is no different! This term we learn about the processes that have shaped the character of Leicester as well as the opportunities and challenges caused by urban growth. Whilst urbanisation might have environmental challenges, geographers examine examples of regeneration and sustainable management such as London road’s cycle lane.

Unit 6 - Living World: Hot Deserts

In term one of this year, Geography students learnt about the location, climate and characteristics of hot deserts around the world which involved a number of geographical skills including reading climate graphs and nutrient cycles. Students then learnt about the amazing ways in which flora and fauna, including xerophytes and ephemerals, have adapted to survive these extreme environments. Whilst geographers assess the challenges in hot deserts, we also evaluate the opportunities before learning about the causes and management of desertification.

Unit 7 - Resource Management 

We all need food, water and energy to live, but the distribution of these resources is uneven around the world which greatly impacts quality of life. Firstly, students study an overview of food, water and energy in the UK before investigating the provision of food on a global scale and the environmental issues that this presents.

Unit 8 - Climate Change 

The earth has already warmed by 1.5 degrees celcius in the past 150 years due to human activity. In this vital area of the Geography curriculum, students examine the causes of climate change in depth, before gaining a depth of knowledge of the potential impacts around the world. Finally, geographers will critically evaluate strategies to both adapt to and mitigrate the impacts of climate change.

Unit 9 - Living with Natural Hazards: Weather related hazards 

Preparing for, and protecting against extreme weather events in the UK has never been important with the threat of recent climate change. This term, geographers evaluate the impacts and responses to an example of a recent extreme weather event: storm Ciara and the Calderdale Floods (2020). Geographers will then begin to understand the causes of extreme weather in studying global atmospheric circulation. This links to the formation of tropical storms which students will then study as well as a specific example: Hurricane Matthew (2016).

Year 11

Unit 1 - The Changing Economic World

We know that the world isn’t exactly divided into rich and poor, but it isn’t equal either. In this unit geographers learn how to measure levels of development including GDP and HDI. Students will then assess the physical and historical causes of uneven development before evaluating the strategies to close the development gap such as industrial development, trade or international aid using Brazil as an example.

Unit 2 - British Landscapes: Coasts

In this topic, geographers gain an understanding of the processes that operate at our coasts including erosion, transportation and deposition. Students will then be able to explain how these processes create distinctive landforms such as headlands, bays, sand dunes and beaches. Coastal landscapes is another example of how the human and natural environments are interconnected as coastal management strategies such as sea walls are designed to protect places from coastal processes. Geographers get the opportunity to see these in action whilst conducting fieldwork in Hunstanton, UK.

Unit 3 - Economic World: Changes to the UK Economy 

Here, geographers will learn how and why the UK is moving towards a post-industrial economy as well as other strategies to improve the economy such as the third runway at Heathrow. It is also an opportunity to learn how the UK is divided and how enterprise zones, HS2 or the Northern Powerhouse can narrow the divide between the geopolitical north and south.

Unit 4 - British Landscapes: Rivers

Rivers flow through most countries around the world providing a drinking source, sanitation, and a method of transportation. Studying rivers provides students with information on managing water resources, construction and flood management. In this unit, we will discover the fluvial processes, landforms including meanders and waterfalls as well as methods of managing river landscapes to protect areas from the effects of flooding.

Unit 5 - Pre-release and revision

For the Geography GCSE paper 3 examination, students receive a pre-release booklet written on one area of their course. Students will spend time examining and analysing this information and preparing to be asked skills and decision-based questions on this topic. The Paper 3 examination is also where students will be assessed on their fieldwork enquiry.

Geographers will also spend this term revising the GCSE through consolidating their knowledge by completing mastery tasks and exam practice.

Key Stage 5

Students study concurrently two sides of the A Level Geography course with specialist teachers for Human Geography and Physical Geography

Human Geography

Year 12

Unit 1 - Contemporary Urban Environments

The first Human Geography topic of our A level focuses on urban growth and urban change which are seemingly ubiquitous processes and present significant environmental and social challenges for human populations. Geography students will examine these processes and challenges and the issues associated with them, in particular the potential for environmental sustainability and social cohesion. Engaging with these themes in a range of urban settings from contrasting areas of the world affords the opportunity for students to appreciate human diversity and develop awareness and insight into profound questions of opportunity, equity and sustainability. 

Unit 2 - Changing Places

This section of our specification focuses on people's engagement with places, their experience of them and the qualities they ascribe to them, all of which are of fundamental importance in their lives.
Through two specific case studies of a distant place (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) and a local place (Corby, UK), students acknowledge this importance and engage with how places are known and experienced, how their character is appreciated, the factors and processes which impact upon places and how they change and develop over time.

Through developing this knowledge, students will gain understanding of the way in which their own lives and those of others are affected by continuity and change in the nature of places.

Unit 3 - Fieldwork and NEA

In term 5, students will begin planning their NEA (non-examined assessment) which is a Geographical enquiry investigating an area of the course that interests them. Students spend 5 days in Liverpool where they will conduct fieldwork and collect their own data through an appropriate research method before presenting and analysing this data on returning to the classroom.  

Year 13

Unit 1 - Global Systems and Governance

The final topic in the Human Geography A level focuses on globalisation – the economic, political and social changes associated with technological and other driving forces which have been a key feature of global economy and society in recent decades.
Increased interdependence and transformed relationships between peoples, states and environments have prompted more or less successful attempts at a global level to manage and govern some aspects of human affairs. Students engage with important dimensions of these phenomena with particular emphasis on international trade and access to markets and the governance of the global commons. This is an exciting opportunity for students to contemplate the many complex dimensions of contemporary world affairs and their own place in and perspective on them.  

Unit 2 - Revision

Students will have the opportunity to engage in exam practice and mastery throughout the KS5 Geography curriculum, however, once the entire A level course has been taught, students will spend time practicing 9 and 20 mark exam questions (AO1 and AO2) and up-levelling their geographical skills (AO3).

Physical Geography

Year 12

Unit 1 - The Water Cycle

Students will start the course by examining the concept of systems approaches to studying physical phenomena, before exploring global and drainage basin scale hydrology. Through this study students will develop an understanding of issues related to both water scarcity and flooding and its central importance for human populations. Students will also explore how water is central in controlling and regulating climate and is fundamental for the functioning of the planet.

Unit 2 - Hazards: Weather related hazards

The Hazards unit focuses on the lithosphere and the atmosphere, which intermittently but regularly present natural hazards to human populations, often in dramatic and sometimes catastrophic fashion.
By exploring the origin and nature of these hazards and the various ways in which people respond to them, students are able to engage with many dimensions of the relationships between people and the environments they occupy. Following exploration of the Water Cycle, students will examine the natural phenomena of wildfires and tropical storms.

Unit 3 - Coastal Systems and Landscapes

This area of our course focuses on coastal zones, which are dynamic environments formed by the interaction of winds, waves, currents and terrestrial and marine sediments. The operation and outcomes of these fundamental geomorphological processes and their association with distinctive landscapes are readily observable across our coastline. In common with water and carbon cycles, a systems approach to study is specified. 

Engaging with this topic is another opportunity to see how the natural and human world are interrelated in studying coastal management. Geographers will be able to see these processes, landforms and management strategies in action when conducting fieldwork in and around Liverpool, UK. 

Year 13

Unit 1 - Coastal Systems and Landscapes

Continuing their study of coastal landscapes, students will explore the Sundarbans to understand their formation and their importance to coastal communities in India and Bangladesh. Students will develop an understanding of how humans are shaping the mangrove forests and assess strategies to effectively and sustainable manage this ecosystem.

Unit 2 - Hazards: tectonic hazards

The Hazards unit focuses on the lithosphere and the atmosphere, which intermittently but regularly present natural hazards to human populations, often in dramatic and sometimes catastrophic fashion.
By exploring the origin and nature of these hazards and the various ways in which people respond to them, students are able to engage with many dimensions of the relationships between people and the environments they occupy. In this second unit within the hazards programme of study, students will examine earthquakes and volcanic activity.

Unit 3 - The Carbon Cycle

The final physical module of the Geography A level focuses on the major stores of carbon at or near the Earth’s surface and the dynamic cyclical relationships associated with the water cycle. These are major elements in the natural environment and understanding them is fundamental to many aspects of physical geography.

This section again, specifies a systems approach to the study of water and carbon cycles. The content invites students to contemplate the magnitude and significance of the cycles at a variety of scales, their relevance to wider geography and their central importance for human populations. 

History

A study of history at Brooke Weston Academy will develop academic and curious historians who will be empowered to think critically, develop perspective and judgement.
The study of history will enable them to understand and communicate the rich and diverse heritage of Britain and the wider world. From a study of how migration shaped the origins of Britain, to a comparative study of European medieval society and Medieval Mali, to a study of the Windrush generation; students are challenged to develop an understanding of their own identity. 
Students will ask questions around change, continuity, significance and causation to uncover the complexity of people’s lives, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups throughout history. 
Pupils will understand the presence of History in society and through an analysis of historical sources and interpretations to develop a confidence to make informed arguments and engage with cultural discussions. 

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Unit 1 - Our migration story: who were the British? What does a study of the Romans reveal about migration in Britain?

Following a lesson exploring ‘What is History really all about?' which encourages students to dispel misconceptions about ’History’ and really understand the purpose of history and the role of historians, students will explore the rich history of British migration over time building upon their understanding of early settlement in Britain from KS2. Students will uncover how Britain became an ‘island’ and explore how migration was central to the establishment of Britain today. Students will then study the Romans and explore what this reveals about migration in Britain. Students will be introduced to historical scholarship specifically the interpretations of David Olusoga and use this to inform their judgements.

Unit 2 - Did the Normans bring a ‘truckload of trouble’ to England after 1066?

Students will explore what led to the decline of the Roman empire and explore the reasons for Anglo-Saxon migration and the foundation of the English state under Alfred, Edward and Athelstan. Students will then explore the causes and consequence of the Norman invasion of England and evaluate the extent to which the Normans were a ‘truckload of trouble’ by exploring the changes that took place as a result of the Norman invasion. Students will evaluate historical interpretations such as Schama and Marc Morris and come to their own historical interpretations about the effects of the Norman migration in England revisiting key themes explored in term 1.  

Unit 3 - Why did barons, ordinary people and families’ rebel against their monarchs in the medieval period?

Students will explore the changing balance of power in medieval society. Students will study how the power of monarchs was affected by families, barons, religion and ordinary people. Students will explore what factors led to the changing balance of power in medieval society and explore how these factors could strengthen or threaten to destabilise existing society. This study will develop pupils’ ability to make informed judgments and continue to develop their understanding of the historical concept of cause and consequence. 

Unit 4 - How connected was the medieval world?

Following a study of medieval Europe in term 3, students will explore the wider medieval world. Students will study medieval Baghdad and explore what this reveals about how ‘connected’ the medieval world was by learning about the rise of Islam, the establishment of the Abbasid caliphate and explore what the location of the city along the Silk Road reveals. Students will explore the interpretation of historian Peter Frankopan and evaluate this interpretation.

 Students will also study the life of Mansa Musa (One of the richest leaders in the world) specifically his life in Mali, his pilgrimage to Mecca and return to evaluate the legacy of Mansa Musa. Students will then explore the significance of Baghdad and Mansa Musa and evaluate what this suggests about how connected the medieval world was following the study of the medieval in Europe in term 2. 

Medieval world through a different lens – look again at power and religion. Look closely at the people who live there, rise of Islam. The middle east was the centre of the medieval world.  Look at Ancient maps and what was the focus then. Golden age in Bagdad, education culture, medical understanding etc.

Unit 5 - How content were the people of England with the religious changes introduced by the Tudors?

What does a study of the Triangular Lodge tell us about how content the people of England were with the religious changes of Elizabeth I? 
Students will look focus their study of the Tudors around a local historical site, Triangular Lodge in Rushton, and explore what this site reveals about public acceptance of the religious changes introduced throughout Tudor England. 

How did Kauffman uncover the lives of Black Tudors? 
Students will conduct an enquiry of evidential thinking and explore how historian Miranda Kauffman uncovered the lives of Black Tudors through an analysis of sources. Students will evaluate the importance of a variety of primary sources in helping historians to uncover the lives of those in the past and the diversity of Britain’s history linking back to the start of the academic year.

Year 8

Unit 1 - To what extent did the English Civil War turn England upside-down?

In this enquiry students will explore how Britain has been affected by civilisation, beliefs and power, this term students start to explore how societies can break down, lead to revolutions and political change. We explore the causes of the Civil War in England in the 17th century and explore how this contributed to the making of the modern British State and their relationships with the wider world.

Unit 2 - How far are the developments in Benin evidence of the West African ‘booms’ of the fifteenth century? 

In this enquiry, students revisit life in Africa in the 1400s and built upon their understanding of the connectivity of the 15th century world following a study of Mali in Y7. Students will what life was like in ‘Benin’ and evaluate the extent to which this study is evident of a ‘golden age’ and a ‘boom’ of the fifteenth century by grappling with historical sources of evidence about trade, culture and development and evaluating how convincing they find historical interpretations such as the interpretation of Toby Green. 

Unit 3 - Could the British Empire have had one set of unified ideas or morals?

This enquiry will revisit the concept of ‘empire’ following on from a study of empire and caliphates in year 7. Students will explore the creation and expansion of the British Empire and explore how this institution had varying effects on individuals, institutions and society over time. Students will explore the expansion of the British Empire in the Americas, Jamaica, India and Africa and explore the extent to which the Empire had ‘one set of unified ideas or morals’. 

Unit 4 - To what extent were the experiences of enslaved and formerly enslaved people uniform?

Following on from a study of the British Empire in term two, this enquiry will revisit British and wider intentions regarding trade that were pertinent in the years of the British Empire and explore how this directly influenced the slave trade. Students will explore the experiences of enslaved people of the British Empire, Africa as well as the Americas to explore the rise of the slave trade, experiences of people in the slave trade and the contributions of formerly enslaved people in its abolition through an analysis of sources. 

Unit 5 - Was the Industrial Revolution ‘Liberty’s Dawn’? 

This enquiry explores the causes of the Industrial revolution and encourages students to appreciate the interconnected nature of factors that led to this event in British history. Students will explore how the Industrial revolution affected society and the lives of individuals. Students will explore historical interpretations and sources to evaluate the extent to which they believe that the Industrial Revolution was ‘Liberty’s Dawn’ as described by historian Emma Griffin and explore why interpretations vary over time. 

Unit 6 - How close did Britain come to achieving true democracy between the Great Reform Act and the Equal Franchise Act?

Students will explore key concepts such as ‘democracy’ to explore the extent to which this was achieved throughout the 20th century. Students will revisit concepts such as ‘revolution and ‘protest’ to evaluate how the actions of people and government during this time led to ‘change’. Students will explore learn about historical events such as Peterloo, the Chartists, the Suffrage movement and changes in legislation to explore the extent to which ‘true democracy’ was achieved. Students will explore varying historical interpretations such as Fern Riddell and explore why interpretations change over time.

Unit 7 - What does a study of the movement to achieve equal rights in society reveal about the 19th and 20th century?

In this enquiry, students will explore the actions of individuals and organisations that took place throughout this period in the hope of achieving equal rights. Students will explore the attempt to achieve ‘civil rights’ in both America and Britain as well as ‘equal rights’ in society. Students will revisit concepts such as ‘democracy’ and ‘protest’ which were explored in term 4 and explore what this study reveals to us about society at this time. 

Unit 8 - How has the decolonization of the British Empire been presented by Historians?

Students will explore how the ‘decolonization’ of the British Empire has been presented by Historians through an analysis of varying historical interpretations throughout time. Students will explore how the British Empire changed and explore why there are varying interpretations of this event in History. 

Year 9

Unit 1 - To what extent did the political action in Russia do anything to change the lives of ordinary Russians? 

Students will explore the rich history of the Golden Age of the Russian Empire through to the collapse of the Romanov Dynasty. This module will afford students the opportunity to build upon, and redevelop, their understanding of Empire, Industrialisation and indentured servitude, which they explored in the Year 8 curriculum on 19th Century History. Students will assess to what extent these grand historical actors and their economic, social and political policies led to any change or continuity within the lives of ordinary Russians. This module will encourage students to explore this change and continuity over the period, assessing the impact of political action on the lives of everyday people. This study combines analysis of both historical interpretations and historical sources to allow students to embed these skills into an answer of this enquiry.

Unit 2 - How did one family cause the destruction of Europe for over half a decade? 

Students will have explored the profound agency that World War One had on the lives of ordinary Russians in term 1. In term 1, students became aware of the consequences of WW1 with a particular focus on the political changes that took place in Russia ultimately contributing to the downfall of Tsarist rule in Russia. This module expands on this and will allow students to explore the causes and the unintended consequences of political decisions from 1914-1918 that culminated in the deadliest war fought within European history. Students will uncover how changes that lead to The Great War happened because of two main factors: the actions of historical actors and the conditions (social, economic, political) that influenced those actors. In this module students will grapple with historical interpretations and primary sources to develop their understanding and skills.

Unit 3 - How did the Second World War transform the base of society? 

Following on from the study of WW1 in term 2, students will explore WW2 in term 3. This module will begin with a sub-enquiry on causation of the Second World War in Europe focusing on the rise of National Socialism in Germany. This sub-enquiry will focus on the actions of Adolf Hitler’s party and the social, economic and political conditions that lead to their rise and the intended consequences of European rulers’ policy of appeasement which will draw on students’ understanding of WW1. Following this, students will grapple with the historical concept of change and continuity. They will assess the extent to which the Second World War fundamentally changed the basis of society for those who lived through it with an acute focus on the lives of ordinary people in both Britain and Germany. Students will utilise primary sources and develop their source analysis skills to assess the utility of the sources in showing change and continuity in people’s lives during WW2. 

Unit 4 - Why do we learn about the Holocaust? 

Following on from the study WW2 in term 3, students will narrow their focus on the related study of the events of the Holocaust. This module demonstrates to students the significance of the events of the Holocaust through the impact of these events on the lives of individuals and families rather than through the use of statistics alone. Students will extensively utilise historical sources to understand the significance of Holocaust at a human level. This module takes much of its inspiration and direction from the Holocaust Educational Trust’s guidelines for delivering Holocaust Education that seeks to explain the significance of the events through learning about the lives of individuals. 

Unit 5 - Why did Windrush become such a big part of our island story?

Students will learn about the significance of mass migration of people from the Caribbean to the UK between 1948 - 1971, commonly called 'Windrush'. Students will draw upon their knowledge of Slavery, Empire and decolonisation. Historical significance is the key concept that will be explored what does Windrush signify to different people across time (At the time, during the 20th Century and contemporary)

Key Stage 4

Year 10

Unit 1 - Conflict and Tension between East and West, 1945-72

This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented. It considers revolutionary movements during this time and focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War, Students will explore how and why conflict occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions which arose during the Cold War. Students will consider role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and how they were affected by and influenced international relations. 

Unit 2 - America, 1840-1895: Expansion and consolidation

This module explores the development of America during a turbulent half century of change. It was a period of expansion and consolidation – the expansion to the west and consolidation of the United States as a nation. Students will study the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of these two developments and the role ideas played in bringing about change to the lives of white settlers, the Plains Indians and the way in which they lived. 

Unit 3 - Britain, Health and the People 1000c to the present day

This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how medicine and public health developed in Britain over a long period of time. It considers the causes, scale, nature and consequences of short and long term developments, their impact on British society and how they were related to the key features and characteristics of the periods during which they took place. Although the focus of this study is the development of medicine and public health in Britain, it will draw on wider world developments that impacted on the core themes. Students will have the opportunity to see how some ideas and events in the wider world affected Britain and will promote the idea that key themes did not develop in isolation, but these ideas and events should be referenced in terms of their effects on the core theme for Britain and British people.

Year 11

Unit 1 - Britain, Health and the People 1000c to the present day

This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how medicine and public health developed in Britain over a long period of time. It considers the causes, scale, nature and consequences of short and long term developments, their impact on British society and how they were related to the key features and characteristics of the periods during which they took place. Although the focus of this study is the development of medicine and public health in Britain, it will draw on wider world developments that impacted on the core themes. Students will have the opportunity to see how some ideas and events in the wider world affected Britain and will promote the idea that key themes did not develop in isolation, but these ideas and events should be referenced in terms of their effects on the core theme for Britain and British people.

Unit 2 - Norman England, C1066-C1100

In this topic, students study in depth the arrival of the Normans and the establishment of their rule. This depth study will focus on major aspects of Norman rule, considered from economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoints of this period. Students will explore varying interpretations of this period and evaluate the extent to which change and continuity occurred following on from the invasion and settlement of the Normans in England by exploring themes such as religion, law, economy and society. 

Unit 3 - Bespoke revision and retrieval activities

 

Key Stage 5

Students study concurrently two sides of the A Level History course with specialist teachers for The Tudors breadth study and the Nazi Germany depth study

The Tudors

Year 12

Unit 1 - Henry VII 1485-1509

In this unit students study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in the Reign of Henry VII through the following key questions: How effectively did the Henry VII restore and develop the powers of the monarch? In what ways and how effectively England was governed during Henry VII reign? How did relations with foreign powers change for Henry VII and how was the succession secured? How did English society and economy change and with what effects during the reign of Henry VII? Between 1489 and 1509 how far did intellectual and religious ideas change and develop and with what effects?

Unit 2 - Henry VIII 1509-1547

This option allows students to study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in the Reign of Henry VIII through the following key questions: How effectively did the Henry VIII alter/emphasise the powers of the monarchy? In what ways and how effectively England was governed during Henry VIII reign? How did relations with foreign powers change for Henry VIII and how was the succession secured? How did English society and economy change and with what effects between 1485 and 1509? Between 1489 and 1509 how far did intellectual and religious ideas change and develop and with what effects?

Unit 3 - NEA

The NEA is an independent investigation into as aspect of Russia of your choice. You will choose to focus on a particular aspect of Russian history which is of interest to you. You will research and write an extended essay of 3,000-3,500 words which focuses on answering a key historical enquiry which will include primary sources and historical interpretations. This is worth 20% of your A Level in History.

Year 13

Unit 1 - The Mid Tudor Crisis: Edward VII and Mary I

In this unit students study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in the reigns of Edward VII and Mary I through the following key questions: How effectively did the both monarchs restore and develop the powers of the monarchy? In what ways and how effectively England was governed during both reigns? How did relations with foreign powers shift for both rulers? How did English society and economy change and with what effects during their reigns? Between 1547 and 1558 how far did intellectual and religious ideas change and develop and with what effects? Students will explore the role and contributions of individuals and evaluate historical interpretations to form their own understanding.

Unit 2 - The Mid Tudor Crisis: Elizabeth I

This section allows students to study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in the reign of Elizabeth I through the following key questions: How effectively did the Elizabeth alter/emphasise the powers of the monarchy? In what ways and how effectively England was governed during Elizabeth’s reign? How did relations with foreign powers change for Henry VIII and how was the succession secured? How did English society and economy change and with what effects between 1558 and 1603? Between 1558 and 1603 how far did intellectual and religious ideas change and develop and with what effects?

Unit 3 - Bespoke revision

Students will use this time to review their A Level studies and engage with bespoke activities designed to support students’ ability to develop and craft their skills as historians. 

Nazi Germany

Year 12

Unit 1 - The Weimar Republic, 1918-1928 (establishment and ‘Golden years’)

In this topic students will explore the impact of WW1 and the political crises of October to November 1918 on Germany and how this provided the context for the establishment of the Weimar Republic and Constitution. Students will explore the strengths and weaknesses of this constitution and evaluate the extent to which ‘democracy’ and stability was achieved by evaluating political, economic and social circumstances at the time. Students will then  explore the ‘Golden Years’ and evaluate how far Germany experienced positive change in the political sphere, economically, socially, culturally and internationally.

Unit 2 - The collapse of Democracy 1928-1933

In this topic, students will explore the economic, social and political impact of the Depression, the result of elections and the effects on governments and policies to evaluate the extent to which there was a ‘collapse in democracy’. Students will then explore the appeal of Nazism and Communism in Germany society, the tactics and fortunes of the extremist parties, including the role of propaganda as well the role of ‘backstairs intrigue’ in contributing to Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor. Students will evaluate and craft historical interpretations to explain what led to a collapse of democracy in 1933 with the appointment of Hitler as Chancellor and the establishment of the ‘Enabling Act’ in 1933.

Year 13

Unit 1 - The Nazi Dictatorship, 1933-1939

In this topic, students will explore Hitler’s consolidation of power including the establishment of the one-party state, the establishment of the 'Terror State' and the use of propaganda to encourage conformity within German society. Students will also explore economic and social policy that was implemented by the Hitler and the Nazis and evaluate the effects of this in society.

Unit 2 - The Racial State, 1933-1941 and The Impact of War, 1939-1945

In this topic, students will study the implementation of Nazi racial ideology and policies. Students will learn about policies towards the mentally ill, asocials, homosexuals, members of religious sects, the Roma and Sinti and Anti-Semitic policies and actions towards the Jews. Students will also explore the the effects of the Anschluss, Reichkristallnacht, emigration and the impact of the war against Poland on policy. 

Unit 3 - Revision

Students will use this time to review their A Level studies and engage with bespoke activities designed to support students’ ability to develop and craft their skills as historians. 

Social Science - Key Stage 5

In Social Science we provide an academic curriculum which develops and empowers student's awareness of their global standing within society. Through guiding them to understand societal and behavioural concepts and constructs. Encouraging students in making positive contributions to society through a critical awareness of Psychological and Sociological theories to explaining contemporary issues. Students develop a breadth and depth of knowledge enabling them to engage in debates across a wide range of topics across Social Sciences.

Psychology

Year 12 

Unit 1 - Approaches to Psychology and Research Methods 

During students’ introduction to Psychology, explanations and theories for behaviour will be explored. Students will look at a range of different Psychological theories in explaining a range of different behaviours including aggression, addiction and other behaviours. Students will be required to use a critical mindset to evaluate the strengths of each explanation and compare towards each other for their accuracy towards human behaviour. 
Students will also look into the types of methodology that Psychologists use in order to study human behaviour using scientific method and procedures within their research.

Unit 2 - Memory and Social Influence

Students will begin to look at theoretical models, frameworks of the Cognitive approach and knowledge of methodology of research to explain and understand how people learn, store and retrieve memories from short term and long term stores. Students will use these models of memory to explain theories of why individuals forget information. Using these theories and explanations, students will then explore the impact that Psychological research has had on the criminal justice system and police investigations.
Students will also explore explanations for people’s obedience and conformity within society, using real life examples such as the Holocaust, the Mai Lai Massacre and Abu Ghraib prison to understand the reasons to why people change their behaviour. In addition, students will investigate theories as to why people resist social pressure to conform and obey and once again apply their knowledge to real life applications such as the changes to Homosexuality laws and attitudes to smoking within society. 

Unit 3 - Attachment and Psychopathology 

Students will explore a range of explanations for forming attachments from key studies including animal research and longitudinal research. Students will be required to evaluate these explanations towards the validity of these theories with the capability of comparing, contrasting and critiquing these explanations. Following on from the key research, students will then study the types of attachments form during infancy and the future implications on attachment in relation to adolescence and adulthood in the form of maintaining friendship/romantic relationships and parental styles.
In addition, students will use their accumulated knowledge of previous modules and approaches to assess different types of mental health issues including Phobias, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Depression, using their knowledge from the first term they will apply different psychological explanations as to the causation and treatments to the different types of mental health issues 

Unit 4 - Application of Knowledge

Students use the knowledge obtained from terms one to three to apply their knowledge in a range of different activities and assessments. In real life Psychology, psychologists will be provided with different scenarios and individuals in which they provide solutions and strategies in order to provide support for individuals. Successful Psychology students will be able to review Psychological theory and understand and explain human behaviour in a range of different scenarios.

Unit 5 - Approaches to Psychology, Biopsychology and Research Methods 

Students will return to their original topics of Approaches to Psychology and Research Methods in greater depth and detail from their first term, introducing new concepts in which explain psychological behaviour and looking at statistics conducting within research. Alongside this, students will explore biological and physiological explanations of human behaviour, through researching and understanding the regions and roles of the brain and looking at the effects of brain damage within patients. 

Year 13

Unit 1 - Biopsychology and Issues and Debates 

Students will continue to explore biological and physiological explanations of human behaviour, through researching and understanding the regions and roles of the brain and looking at the effects of brain damage within patients. Students will use their prior knowledge from the previous academic year to link Biological factors towards their influences to human behaviour. In addition, students use their knowledge of Approaches to Psychology from year 12 content to discover the Psychological challenges within Issues and Debates in which they will research the barriers and challenges in contemporary psychological research. Also, drawing comparisons and identifying differences between contemporary approaches to explanations of human behaviour. 

Unit 2 - Forensic Psychology and Gender 

During students’ introduction to Forensic Psychology, students look at the US and UK criminal profiling techniques used to profile criminals. Students will compare and contrast these different approaches. They will then apply their knowledge towards the Psychological explanations for offending behaviour before moving onto psychological explanations to managing criminal offenders.
Within Gender, students explore the causes of gender development and discuss internal vs. external causes. Students will utilise their knowledge of the main Psychological approaches such as Social Influence and Biological explanations to link theory to explanations towards behaviour of gender identity. 

Unit 3 - Schizophrenia

Students will look at the medical diagnosis and symptoms of Schizophrenia and discover the challenges and issues of diagnosing mental health issues. Further exploring the Psychological and Biological explanations for Schizophrenia before looking at the types of treatments available. 

Unit 4 -  Application of Knowledge and Revision 

Students use the knowledge obtained from terms one to three to apply their knowledge in a range of different activities and assessments. In real life Psychology, psychologists will be provided with different scenarios and individuals in which they provide solutions and strategies in order to provide support for individuals. Successful Psychology students will be able to review Psychological theory and understand and explain human behaviour in a range of different scenarios.

Sociology

Year 12

Unit 1 - Families and Households

Students review and analyse the structure of the family system and households within society. Students will review Sociological viewpoints and arguments including Functionalism, Feminism and Marxist approaches. In addition, students will be expected to analyse and explain the sociological changes. Students will also explore the demographic changes of the family from the 1950s onwards, students will be expected to use sociological explanations to explain the reasons for changes within the family. Finally, students review social policies introduced by a variety of UK governments that have influenced and changed the structures of the family.

Unit 2 - Education

Students begin to explore class differences within society and the influence that social classes have on academic performance. Students will be comparing the internal factors of academic performance and external factors of academic performance and evaluate which sociological explanations influence students performance in school the most. Following on from comparing social class differences, students will then review gender and ethnic differences within the education system and use sociological explanations to explain the differences that occur between these sets of groups. 

Unit 3 - Theory and Methods 

Students will explore the different Sociological explanations that underpin Sociology overall, looking at Marxist, Functionalist, Feminism and Post Modernism approaches to explain a variety of different institutions within society. Students will also consider the different research methods that could be used to measure and understand society and be able to compare the strengths and weaknesses for each method to be used within an education system 

Year 13

Unit 1 - Crime and Deviance & Beliefs in Society  

Within Crime and Deviance, students will discuss, explore and discover the different Sociological explanations towards crime and deviance within society. Students will be expected to compare and contrast, alongside discussing the accuracy of their sociological explanations towards crime within society. 
During Beliefs in Society, students will supplement their knowledge of sociological explanations towards understanding the role of religion within society. Students will be expected to use their sociological knowledge and employ towards religious institutions 

Unit 2 - Crime and Deviance & Beliefs in Society  

Students will explore the demographic differences between ethnicity, gender and class within crime. Students will be expected to look at statistics from the ONS to help understand the demographic differences. Using this knowledge, students will use sociological theory to explain these differences.
Within Beliefs in Society, students will research the role of secularisation within the UK and US. Once again looking at the sociological reasons for change of beliefs in society and understanding the causes for a religious shift within the UK and the impacts that this has had on religious institution.

Unit 3 - Crime and Deviance & Beliefs in Society

To conclude in Crime and Deviance, students will look at globalisation and the changes and impacts that a more modern and contemporary society is having on crime. Students will look at the new forms of emerging crime within society, due to globalisation and will analyse the causes to these changes, including looking at environmental and state crimes by governments. 
During Beliefs in Society, students will look at the scientific community and comparing modern ideology to more traditional ideology such as religion and comparing and contrasting these influences on our society.

Unit 4 - Application of Knowledge and Revision 

Students use the knowledge obtained from terms one to three to apply their knowledge in a range of different activities and assessments. Students will be provided with different scenarios and individuals in which they provide explanations for different topics. Successful sociology students will be able to apply their knowledge using sociological theory

Enrichment Opportunities

The GCSE Geography students are required to undertake two geographical enquiries, each of which must include the use of primary data, collected as part of a fieldwork exercise. Fieldwork takes place outside of the classroom and on two separate occasions. The cost of the field trips vary depending on the distance to the location and duration of the stay (i.e. there is a small charge for fuel and any overnight stays will incur an additional cost). GCSE History students are not required to complete any field work, however students will have the opportunity to see the ‘Doctors show’ production as part of their study of ‘Britain: Health and the people: c1000 to the present day’. Visits to local places of worship and visits from external speakers often forms part of the Religious Studies course.

The Team

Kevin Glesinger

Senior Assistant Principal

Teacher of Geography
kglesinger@brookeweston.org

Carlien Fourie

Teacher of Humanities
cfourie@brookeweston.org

Lewis Holdcroft

Teacher of History and Humanities
lholdcroft@brookeweston.org

Adam Marriott

Teacher of Humanities and BPE/CPD Lead
amarriott@brookeweston.org

Paul Murray

Teacher of Humanities and Social Sciences Lead
pmurray@brookeweston.org

Adelle Northern

Head of Department

Teacher of History
anorthern@brookeweston.org

Natalie Polley

Head of History
npolley@brookeweston.org

Matt Reay

Teacher of Humanities and History                                         mreay@brookeweston.org

Eloise Scarth

Teacher of Humanities and Geography
escarth@brookeweston.org

Juliette Smith

Head of Geography
jsmith@brookeweston.org 

Rebecca Waterson

Senior Vice Principal

Teacher of Humanities
rwaterson@brookeweston.org

 

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